Taken from here: https://www.alislam.org/friday-sermon/2015-07-24.html#summary-tab

Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, the founder of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, had previously received a revelation associated with Misri:

Do not kill Zainab.

– Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, Al Badr 13 February 1908

The revelation has been explained as follows:

In early 1908 Mr Hafiz Ahmad sought marriage proposals for his two daughters Zainab and Kalsoom. There were a few proposals for Zainab and among those the Promised Messiahas [Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad] did not like a proposal from a Mr Misri, but as was his way he did not force the matter. It is during these days the Promised Messiah received the revelation: “Do not kill Zainab”. Mr Hafiz understood this revelation to mean that he should get his daughter married to Mr Misri assuming the revelation had overridden earlier advice of the Promised Messiah. He had his daughter married to Mr Misri. The revelation is dated 9 February whereas his daughter’s marriage took place on 17 February. The date of the marriage was chronicled as it took place with a couple of other marriages including that of Hazrat Nawab Mubaraka Begum. God had clearly forewarned about Zainab’s marriage, inferring that there would be trouble, but her father presumed it to mean the opposite. Proof exists that the Promised Messiah advised against this marriage because when Mr Misri later left the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community someone said the Promised Messiah had indeed advised against this marriage to him. The narrator said he did not like it when the marriage went ahead and submitted to the Promised Messiah that he was commissioned by God and God commands to listen to those commissioned by him but Mr Hafiz had not done so. The Promised Messiah replied that this was indeed so, but added that he did not interfere in such matters.

The second Caliph wrote that although he had no doubt about this tradition when it came before him but he thought of seeking a concrete proof. The very next day he received a letter in the post in which someone had written that when he was in Qadian he learned the holy Quran from Mr Hafiz Ahmad who once told him that the Promised Messiah had asked him to marry his daughter elsewhere but he misunderstood his revelation and thought his earlier advice was not correct and married his daughter to Mr Misri. He said Mr Misri was very harsh with his daughter and he felt it was a consequence of him not abiding by what the Promised Messiah had said. The second Caliph writes that he remembers Mr Misri beating up his father-in-law in the middle of town, following which [his predecessor] the first Caliph was very displeased with him and the second Caliph had pleaded with him to forgive Mr Misri.

Sheikh Abdul Rehman al-Misri is part of history of the community. He was an educated man who took the pledge of allegiance in the lifetime of the Promised Messiah. The Promised Messiah and Chaudhry Nasrullah Khan Sahib sponsored him to go to Egypt. It was owing to his trip to Egypt that he was given the title of ‘Misri’ (Misr being the Arabic name for Egypt). A time came that he highly opposed the second Caliph and said much against him and tried to create discord in the community. God protected the community against his ploys and some people were shown dreams exposing his ploys. He had so much respect and standing in the community that when he left someone wrote to the second Caliph from Africa that Mr Misri’s separation from the community was highly worrisome because if such important and significant people lost their faith what was to be said of the faith of ordinary people like the letter-writer. The second Caliph wrote back saying it was for God to decide who was important and significant and not for the letter-writer, adding that God had made Mr Misri lose his way which proved that the letter-writer was important and significant and not Mr Misri. After his disagreement and leaving the community, Mr Misri tried to show his importance by associating himself with the revelation but after the second Caliph exposed the reality behind it all, he complained why was his wife dragged into it all.

The second Caliph remarked at the tremendous prophecy ‘Do not kill Zainab’ and said Mr Misri himself drew attention to it at the latter stage. He said this was like Arabs cite a story about a man who took out a knife to slaughter a goat but then forgot about it. In their play his children push the knife in the dust on the ground. While he looked for the ‘lost’ knife the goat dragged its feet on the dust and exposed the knife. When someone causes their own ruination Arabs say he has exposed the knife like the goat did. Had he abided by what the Promised Messiah advised him his faith would not have been wasted. Believers should listen to those sent by God.

– Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, Friday Sermon 24 July 2015 as summarised by alislam.org

 

Do not kill Zainab.

– Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, Al Badr 13 February 1908

The revelation has been explained as follows:

In early 1908 Mr Hafiz Ahmad sought marriage proposals for his two daughters Zainab and Kalsoom. There were a few proposals for Zainab and among those the Promised Messiahas [Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad] did not like a proposal from a Mr Misri, but as was his way he did not force the matter. It is during these days the Promised Messiah received the revelation: “Do not kill Zainab”. Mr Hafiz understood this revelation to mean that he should get his daughter married to Mr Misri assuming the revelation had overridden earlier advice of the Promised Messiah. He had his daughter married to Mr Misri. The revelation is dated 9 February whereas his daughter’s marriage took place on 17 February. The date of the marriage was chronicled as it took place with a couple of other marriages including that of Hazrat Nawab Mubaraka Begum. God had clearly forewarned about Zainab’s marriage, inferring that there would be trouble, but her father presumed it to mean the opposite. Proof exists that the Promised Messiah advised against this marriage because when Mr Misri later left the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community someone said the Promised Messiah had indeed advised against this marriage to him. The narrator said he did not like it when the marriage went ahead and submitted to the Promised Messiah that he was commissioned by God and God commands to listen to those commissioned by him but Mr Hafiz had not done so. The Promised Messiah replied that this was indeed so, but added that he did not interfere in such matters.

The second Caliph wrote that although he had no doubt about this tradition when it came before him but he thought of seeking a concrete proof. The very next day he received a letter in the post in which someone had written that when he was in Qadian he learned the holy Quran from Mr Hafiz Ahmad who once told him that the Promised Messiah had asked him to marry his daughter elsewhere but he misunderstood his revelation and thought his earlier advice was not correct and married his daughter to Mr Misri. He said Mr Misri was very harsh with his daughter and he felt it was a consequence of him not abiding by what the Promised Messiah had said. The second Caliph writes that he remembers Mr Misri beating up his father-in-law in the middle of town, following which [his predecessor] the first Caliph was very displeased with him and the second Caliph had pleaded with him to forgive Mr Misri.

Sheikh Abdul Rehman al-Misri is part of history of the community. He was an educated man who took the pledge of allegiance in the lifetime of the Promised Messiah. The Promised Messiah and Chaudhry Nasrullah Khan Sahib sponsored him to go to Egypt. It was owing to his trip to Egypt that he was given the title of ‘Misri’ (Misr being the Arabic name for Egypt). A time came that he highly opposed the second Caliph and said much against him and tried to create discord in the community. God protected the community against his ploys and some people were shown dreams exposing his ploys. He had so much respect and standing in the community that when he left someone wrote to the second Caliph from Africa that Mr Misri’s separation from the community was highly worrisome because if such important and significant people lost their faith what was to be said of the faith of ordinary people like the letter-writer. The second Caliph wrote back saying it was for God to decide who was important and significant and not for the letter-writer, adding that God had made Mr Misri lose his way which proved that the letter-writer was important and significant and not Mr Misri. After his disagreement and leaving the community, Mr Misri tried to show his importance by associating himself with the revelation but after the second Caliph exposed the reality behind it all, he complained why was his wife dragged into it all.

The second Caliph remarked at the tremendous prophecy ‘Do not kill Zainab’ and said Mr Misri himself drew attention to it at the latter stage. He said this was like Arabs cite a story about a man who took out a knife to slaughter a goat but then forgot about it. In their play his children push the knife in the dust on the ground. While he looked for the ‘lost’ knife the goat dragged its feet on the dust and exposed the knife. When someone causes their own ruination Arabs say he has exposed the knife like the goat did. Had he abided by what the Promised Messiah advised him his faith would not have been wasted. Believers should listen to those sent by God.

– Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, Friday Sermon 24 July 2015 as summarised by alislam.org