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“Ahmadiyya, A Study in contemporary Islam on the West African Coast” by Humphrey J. Fisher (1963)

Intro
Humphrey J. Fisher was born September 20, 1933, in Dunedin, New Zealand. He recently died in 2018, he had retired in 2001. He attended Deep Springs Junior College, 1950-52; Harvard University, B.A. (magna cum laude), 1955; Oxford University, D.Phil., 1959. Religion: Quaker. CAREER: University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, England, 1952—, began as lecturer, became reader in African history, became emeritus professor of history. His first book on Ahmadiyya was published in 1960. Humphrey was way ahead of his time for the 1960s and 70s in the way he chose to bring up his children. He would work several days a week from our home in Hampton, south-west London, to be there for his four sons. He never missed a concert, sports match or other event. When I started school, he managed his commute so that he could wave as I crossed the railway bridge on my way to school. In 1986 he moved to Newchurch in the Welsh borders. Long an active Quaker, he became ordained in the (Anglican) Church in Wales by training at a Catholic college, and preached at Presbyterian churches. He also continued his academic career, teaching Islam and its history and drawing together teachers and students of different religions. At St Mary’s church, Newchurch, he provided tea-making facilities for walkers on Offa’s Dyke path, drawing thousands of visitors into the church. He also instituted the annual Kilvert pilgrimage, now in its 20th year, linking the four rural churches he served as a non-stipendiary minister.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________The book

This book was published by The Nigerian Institute of social and economic research. It was printed from at the Oxford University Press in 1963. Humphrey J. Fisher also wrote “Ahmadiyya in Sierra Leone”, which was published in the “Sierra Leone Bulletin of Religion 2, no. 1, June 1960. He also wrote, “Ahmadiyya in Nigeria” (1961). “Ahmadiyya in the Gambia, French territories and Liberia”, West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 93. “Planting Ahmadiyya in Ghana”, West Africa 2226, 1960, pp. 121.

Islam, A Study in contemporay Islam on the West African Coast by Humphrey J. Fisher (1963) Pages 1-25

Islam, A Study in contemporay Islam on the West African Coast by Humphrey J. Fisher (1963) pages 26-61

Islam, A Study in contemporay Islam on the West African Coast by Humphrey J. Fisher (1963) pages 62-99

Islam, A Study in contemporay Islam on the West African Coast by Humphrey J. Fisher (1963) pages 99-141

Islam, A Study in contemporay Islam on the West African Coast by Humphrey J. Fisher (1963) pages 141-183

Islam, A Study in contemporay Islam on the West African Coast by Humphrey J. Fisher (1963) pages 141 to end
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His full list of books on Ahmadiyya

  1. Fisher, Humphrey J., “Planting Ahmadiyya in Ghana”, West Africa 2226, 1960, pp. 121
  2. Fisher, Humphrey J., “The Ahmadiyya movement in Nigeria”, African Affairs 1, 1961, pp. 60-88.
  3. Fisher, Humphrey J., “Ahmadiyya in the Gambia, French territories and Liberia”, West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 93
  4. Fisher, Humphrey J., “Ahmadiyya in Sierra Leone”, West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 73
  5. Fisher, Humphrey J., Ahmadiyyah: A study in contemporary Islam on the West African coast, 1963, London, Oxford University Press, 206 p.
  6. The concept of Evolution in Ahmadiyya Thought, Fisher, Moslem World-1970’s


Other academic books on Ahmadiyya

  1. Akanbi, Hafsa Mosunmola, Ahmadiyya in Lagos, 1968, bachelor thesis, University of Ibadan
  2. Lanfry, Jacques and Michael L. Fitzgerald, “The Ahmadiyya community and its expansion in Africa”, Encounter: Documents for Muslim-Christian understanding 2, 1974
  3. Balogun, Ismail A. B., Islam versus Ahmadiyya in Nigeria, 1977, Lahore, Sh. Muhammad Ashraf, 187 p.
  4. Yacoob, May M., Ahmadiyya: Urban adaption to the Ivory Coast, 1980, Ph.D. dissertation, Boston University, 252 p.
  5. Yacoob, May M., Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Migrant women in Abidjan, 1983, Boston, Boston University, African Studies Center, 16 p.
  6. Yacoob, May M., “Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan”, Asian and African Studies (Annual of the Israel Oriental Society) 20, 1986, pp. 125-140.
  7. Yacoob, May M., “Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan”, Asian and African Studies (Annual of the Israel Oriental Society) 20, 1986, pp. 125-140.
  8. Yacoob, May M., “Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan”, Nehemia Levtzion and Humphrey J. Fisher (ed.), Rural and urban Islam in West Africa, 1987, Boulder, Lynne Rienner, pp. 119-134.
  9. Solaja-Alagago, R. O., Evolution of Anwarul-Islam movement of Nigeria: The Nigerian solution to the Ahmadiyyah problem, 1984, master thesis, University of Ibadan

______________________________________________________________________________________________
Ahmadi’s co-operated with him

It’s important to note this. This wasn’t meant to be anti-Ahmadiyya. However, Ahmadi’s are calling it anti these days, since it exposes how Ahmadiyya worked with the British government to exploit african people and their resources. Later on Trimingham quoted it extensively.

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This book is quoted by everyone and anyone studying Ahmadiyya in Africa

1—Piety and Power: Muslims and Christians in West Africa By Lamin Sanneh
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Links and Related Essay’s

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/professor-humphrey-j-fisher-and-j-spencer-trimingham-called-ahmadiyya-a-maritime-implantation-in-west-africa/

https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/fisher-humphrey-john-1933

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/09/03/early-history-of-ahmadiyya-in-ghana-by-haneef-keelson/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_the_Gambia#cite_note-Fisher126-1

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/06/14/who-is-ghulam-nabi-gilkar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/12/14/did-general-muhammad-zia-ul-haq-join-ahmadiyya-in-the-1940s/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/islam-vs-ahmadiyya-in-nigeria-1975-by-dr-ismail-a-b-balogan-b-a-ph-d-london-university-of-ibadan/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=Balogan

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/10/16/trimingham-j-spencer-the-influence-of-islam-upon-africa-1968/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/01/13/ahmadi-medical-officers-doctors-who-served-in-the-british-military-during-ww-2/
_____________________________________________________________________________________________Tags

#ahmadiyya #ahmadiyyatrueislam #ahmadiapartheid #Ahmadiyyat #rabwah #qadian #meetthekhalifa #muslimsforpeace #ahmadiyyafactcheckblog #nolifewithoutkhalifa #AhmadiMosqueattack #AhmadiyyaPersecution #Mosqueattack #trueislam #atifmian #ahmadiyyainafrica #fisheronahmadiyya

Professor Humphrey J. Fisher and J. Spencer Trimingham called Ahmadiyya a “maritime implantation” in West Africa


Intro

Professor Humphrey J. Fisher wrote “Ahmadiyyah: A study in contemporary Islam on the West African coast” (1963), London, Oxford University Press.  He was the first person to write extensively about Ahmadiyya in West Africa and other parts of Africa.  He presented enough information to prove that the British Government was helping Ahmadiyya convert Orthodox Muslims.  He also called Ahmadiyya a parasite to Orthodox Islam.  He even called the grave of Yuz Asaf as a “gimmick”. Also read how the British Government gave Ahmadi’s 4000 acres of free land in 1915.

Hanson tells us
 “The postwar expansion of Ahmadi missionaries from South Asia led Humphrey Fisher to stress external control of the movement in West Africa and J Spencer Trimingham to argue that the Ahmadiya was a ‘maritime implantation’ in West Africa. Both Trimingham and Fisher allowed the changes of the mid-twentieth century to obscure their view of African initiative in the movement’s genesis in the West Africa.”

An important source
Trimingham, J. Spencer. The Influence of Islam Upon Africa. New York: Frederick A.
Praeger, 1968.

Scans from Trimingham

 

Related Essay’s and links
https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=Fisher

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=above+the+law

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=violent+jihad

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/01/09/the-history-of-ahmadiyya-in-uganda-the-british-government-gave-ahmadis-4000-acres-of-free-land/

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-the-school-of-oriental-and-african-studies/article/humphrey-j-fisher-ahmadiyyah-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-x-206-pp-london-etc-oxford-university-press-for-the-nigerian-institute-of-social-and-economic-research-1963-35s/4E2803CA59EC8969CDC8FB27BFDC9059

https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Ahmadiyya_Movement_in_Nigeria.html?id=91fKHAAACAAJ

https://books.google.com/books?id=C2DxBwAAQBAJ&pg=PA11&lpg=PA11&dq=Humphrey+J+Fisher+and+ahmadiyya&source=bl&ots=-eayPuf3b5&sig=kFuL6U5O65Sh0_d66-Mge0VOmPM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjHwaSon8rdAhWQIDQIHQGcD_AQ6AEwDHoECAIQAQ#v=onepage&q=Humphrey%20J%20Fisher%20and%20ahmadiyya&f=false

Tags
#ahmadiyya #ahmadiyyatrueislam #ahmadiapartheid #Ahmadiyyat #rabwah #qadian #meetthekhalifa #muslimsforpeace #ahmadiyyafactcheckblog #nolifewithoutkhalifa #AhmadiMosqueattack #AhmadiyyaPersecution #Mosqueattack #trueislam #atifmian
#mkanigeria #nigeria #ahmadiyyainnigeria

Who is Humphrey J. Fisher? The writer who wrote extensively about Ahmadiyya in Africa

 

  1. Koya, Fathuddin Sayyed Muhammad, Islam and the Ahmadiyyah Movement, 1995, Bauch, College of Islamic Studies, 80 p.
  2. Fisher, Humphrey J., “Planting Ahmadiyya in Ghana”, West Africa 2226, 1960, pp. 121
  3. Fisher, Humphrey J., “The Ahmadiyya movement in Nigeria”, African Affairs 1, 1961, pp. 60-88.
  4. Fisher, Humphrey J., “Ahmadiyya in the Gambia, French territories and Liberia”, West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 93
  5. Fisher, Humphrey J., “Ahmadiyya in Sierra Leone”, West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 73
  6. Fisher, Humphrey J., Ahmadiyyah: A study in contemporary Islam on the West African coast, 1963, London, Oxford University Press, 206 p.
  7. Akanbi, Hafsa Mosunmola, Ahmadiyya in Lagos, 1968, bachelor thesis, University of Ibadan
  8. Lanfry, Jacques and Michael L. Fitzgerald, “The Ahmadiyya community and its expansion in Africa”, Encounter: Documents for Muslim-Christian understanding 2, 1974
  9. Balogun, Ismail A. B., Islam versus Ahmadiyya in Nigeria, 1977, Lahore, Sh. Muhammad Ashraf, 187 p.
  10. 10 Yacoob, May M., Ahmadiyya: Urban adaption to the Ivory Coast, 1980, Ph.D. dissertation, Boston University, 252 p.
  11. 11 Yacoob, May M., Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Migrant women in Abidjan, 1983, Boston, Boston University, African Studies Center, 16 p.
  12. 12 Yacoob, May M., “Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan”, Asian and African Studies (Annual of the Israel Oriental Society) 20, 1986, pp. 125-140.
  13. 13 Yacoob, May M., “Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan”, Asian and African Studies (Annual of the Israel Oriental Society) 20, 1986, pp. 125-140.
  14. 14 Yacoob, May M., “Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan”, Nehemia Levtzion and Humphrey J. Fisher (ed.), Rural and urban Islam in West Africa, 1987, Boulder, Lynne Rienner, pp. 119-134.
  15. 15 Solaja-Alagago, R. O., Evolution of Anwarul-Islam movement of Nigeria: The Nigerian solution to the Ahmadiyyah problem, 1984, master thesis, University of Ibadan

Koya, Fathuddin Sayyed Muhammad, Islam and the Ahmadiyyah Movement, 1995, Bauch, College of Islamic Studies, 80 p.

Contributors
Koya, Fathuddin Sayyed Muhammad

Fisher, Humphrey J., “Planting Ahmadiyya in Ghana”, West Africa 2226, 1960, pp. 121

Contributors
Fisher, Humphrey J.

Abstract
History of the Ahmadiyya in West Africa in its three disparate elements: in the South, the mass conversion of

Fisher, Humphrey J., “The Ahmadiyya movement in Nigeria”, African Affairs 1, 1961, pp. 60-88.

Fisher, Humphrey J., “Ahmadiyya in the Gambia, French territories and Liberia”, West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 93

Abstract
The Ahmadiyya movement has met with much opposition from the orthodox Muslims, in the Gambia, who disapproved of Ahmadiyya doctrine and disliked their separatism. The government was concerned for Muslim harmony and was afraid for damage of Muslim-Christian relations. The Gambian Ahmadis however, are not zealous in dogmatic conviction nor in particularist action. Their chief concern is Islamic education; 1960, the coming of a missionary was allowed and a school will be built. Ahmadi penetration in French territory is very slight. In Liberia an Ahmadi mission has been established only a short while ago.

Fisher, Humphrey J., “Ahmadiyya in Sierra Leone”, West Africa 46, 1962, pp. 73

Abstract
In Sierra Leone Ahmadyya was established as a corollary of a gold rush. Nazir Ahmad Ali is the father of Sierra Leonean Ahmadyya; he began his carreer in the Gold Coast in 1929 and was transferred to Freetown in 1937. Late in 1939 he made crucial move for Ahmadiyya in Sierra Leone, travelling far eastwards to Baomahuh, then a prosperous gold-mining centre. Ali was welcomed by all the Muslims there and when the goldboom died away those who had become Ahmadi took the new doctrine with them. Now the main strength of Ahmadiyya is still around Bo and Baomahun.

Fisher, Humphrey J., Ahmadiyyah: A study in contemporary Islam on the West African coast, 1963, London, Oxford University Press, 206 p.

Abstract
An account of the history and teaching of this Islamic sect. The life of Ghulam Ahmad (1835-1908 in the Punjab), the founder of Ahmadiyyah, is outlined very briefly in the introduction. The 1st part of the book gives the West African setting, pagan and Islamic. The 2nd section is concerned with Ahmadiyyah doctrine; the author treats of its teaching in relation to Islam, to Moslim modernism, to Christianity and to society. Part 3 describes the history of Ahmadiyyah in West Africa, chiefly in Ghana, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, with a glance at the Gambia, Liberia and the former French territories. In part 4 the author considers Ahmadiyyah belief, organization, education, finance and politics in West Africa. (Rev. in Afr. Affairs, 1964, p. 150-151 by E.G. Parrinder.)

Akanbi, Hafsa Mosunmola, Ahmadiyya in Lagos, 1968, bachelor thesis, University of Ibadan

Contributors
Akanbi, Hafsa Mosunmola

Lanfry, Jacques and Michael L. Fitzgerald, “The Ahmadiyya community and its expansion in Africa”, Encounter: Documents for Muslim-Christian understanding 2, 1974

Balogun, Ismail A. B., Islam versus Ahmadiyya in Nigeria, 1977, Lahore, Sh. Muhammad Ashraf, 187 p.

Yacoob, May M., Ahmadiyya: Urban adaption to the Ivory Coast, 1980, Ph.D. dissertation, Boston University, 252 p.

Yacoob, May M., Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Migrant women in Abidjan, 1983, Boston, Boston University, African Studies Center, 16 p.

Abstract
Certain Islamic beliefs relating to the role of women have changed under the stresses and pressures of urbanization and in this context Moslem migrants in Abidjan have accepted the Ahmadiyya because they have found it useful in solving problems which arose with migration. Ahmadiyya exists and is accepted only to the extent that it is able to provide solutions. It provides access to resources otherwise difficult to obtain such as schools, hospitals, guidance, and above all, a community. It also provides a sense of identity and ethnicity. It has been accepted because the traditional concepts of Islam were not providing the answers to these needs. Data presented in the article are based on fieldwork conducted in Abidjan between November 1976 and April 1978.

Yacoob, May M., “Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan”, Asian and African Studies (Annual of the Israel Oriental Society) 20, 1986, pp. 125-140.

Yacoob, May M., “Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan”, Asian and African Studies (Annual of the Israel Oriental Society) 20, 1986, pp. 125-140.

Yacoob, May M., “Ahmadiyya and urbanization: Easing the integration of rural women in Abidjan”, Nehemia Levtzion and Humphrey J. Fisher (ed.), Rural and urban Islam in West Africa, 1987, Boulder, Lynne Rienner, pp. 119-134.

Contributors
Yacoob, May M. | Levtzion, Nehemia | Fisher, Humphrey J.

Solaja-Alagago, R. O., Evolution of Anwarul-Islam movement of Nigeria: The Nigerian solution to the Ahmadiyyah problem, 1984, master thesis, University of Ibadan

Mirza Tahir Ahmad and #ahmadis in Ghana working for the dictator Jerry John Rawlings

Intro
Watch my video on this.
In Ghana, like many other countries, the Ahmadiyya Movement was political. In 1997, Mirza Tahir Ahmad admitted that Ahmadi’s had worked in the election process of the famous dictator Jerry John Rawlings in 1992 and 1996. Mirza Tahir Ahmad also admitted that the fake opposition party of 1992 and 1996 were led by undercover #ahmadi’s. In this era, Mirza Tahir Ahmad lied about the amount of converts in Ghana was extensive.

We estimate that there are about 5000 #ahmadis in all of Ghana by 2020. Most of these people have converted to Ahmadiyya through the Ahmadiyya schools, which also doubles as a  mosque. By 1958, there seems to be only one Ahmadiyya mosque in the entire country (see Foreign Missions). However, the same book lies and claims that there were 100+ mosques controlled by the Ahmadiyya community. However, there were only 1-2 Ahmadi mullahs working the entire country, thus, its a lie. Even today, in 2020, Ahmadiyya sources purposely inflate the amount of mosques which are under ahmadiyya control. We estimate no more than 20 Ahmadiyya mosques in the entire country, and most of the worshippers aren’t even Ahmadi.

In this video, Mirza Tahir Ahmad talks about taking jewelry from women as chanda, so sick!!!

He also admits that intelligence officers from Ghana would seek the advice from the Khalifa.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________Mirza Tahir Ahmad lies and claims to have had more than 200,000 converts from Ghana. Mirza Tahir Ahmad claims that many Ghanian’s working in government were Ahmadi. He mentions:

1. The speaker of the assembly
2. opposition party leader
3. Deputy Speaker
4. Defense minister
5. Chairman of the ruling party
6. important commissions
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Links and Related Essay’s

https://youtu.be/ZsE-Z79MXlY

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2021/01/10/the-history-of-ahmadiyya-in-ghana/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-the-ahmadi-mullah-nazir-ahmad-mubasher/

http://ahmadiyyamosque.blogspot.com/search/label/Ghana

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/l-b-agusto-was-a-pioneer-member-of-the-ahmadiyya-movement-in-nigeria-but-he-renounced-membership-when-he-realized-that-members-in-southfield-london-believed-founder-ghulam-ahmad-was-a-prophet/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-fadl-ul-rahman-hakim-the-first-permanent-ahmadi-mullah-sent-to-british-west-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/abdur-rahim-nayyars-first-speech-in-british-west-africa-was-at-the-famous-shitta-bey-mosque/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-fadl-ul-rahman-hakim-the-first-permanent-ahmadi-mullah-sent-to-british-west-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/the-3rd-sect-of-ahmadis-were-created-in-lagos-nigeria-in-1922/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_Ghana

Servants of Allah: Maulana Nazir Ahmad Ali Sahib

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/in-1922-the-ahmadiyya-movement-stole-the-adepopo-mosque-from-the-quranic-people-in-lagos-nigeria/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-jibril-martin-1888-1959-the-ahmadi-in-nigeria-who-rejected-the-qadiani-khilafat-and-created-the-3rd-sect-of-ahmadis/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/21/who-is-the-ahmadi-mullah-abdur-rahim-nayyar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-jibril-martin-1888-1959-the-ahmadi-in-nigeria-who-rejected-the-qadiani-khilafat-and-created-the-3rd-sect-of-ahmadis/

Stefan Reichmuth. “Education and the Growth of Religious Associations among Yoruba Muslims: The Ansar-Ud-Deen Society of Nigeria”, Journal of Religion in Africa, Vol. 26, Fasc. 4 (Nov., 1996). p 8.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jibril_Martin

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/professor-humphrey-j-fisher-and-j-spencer-trimingham-called-ahmadiyya-a-maritime-implantation-in-west-africa/

https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/fisher-humphrey-john-1933

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/09/03/early-history-of-ahmadiyya-in-ghana-by-haneef-keelson/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_the_Gambia#cite_note-Fisher126-1

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/06/14/who-is-ghulam-nabi-gilkar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/12/14/did-general-muhammad-zia-ul-haq-join-ahmadiyya-in-the-1940s/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/islam-vs-ahmadiyya-in-nigeria-1975-by-dr-ismail-a-b-balogan-b-a-ph-d-london-university-of-ibadan/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=Balogan

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/10/16/trimingham-j-spencer-the-influence-of-islam-upon-africa-1968/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/01/13/ahmadi-medical-officers-doctors-who-served-in-the-british-military-during-ww-2/

  1. “THE AHMADIYYA MOVEMENT IN NIGERIA”. HARVARD DIVINITY SCHOOL. RETRIEVED SEPTEMBER 19, 2015.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d e Animashaun, Bashir (2012) Jibril Felix Martin (1888 – 1959) and the spread of Western education among Muslims in 20th century Lagos. Ilorin Journal of History and International Studies Vol 3 No 1 2012_____________________________

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Tags

#ahmadiyyainafrica #ahmadiyyainwestafrica #ahmadiyyainnigeria #ahmadiyyainlagos #lagos #ahmadiyyainghana #ahmadiyyainsierraleone #Ahmadiyyainbritishwestafrica #ahmadiyyainbritishcolonies #ahmadiyyaviacolonialism #ahmadiyyafactcheckblog #ahmadiyya #ahmadiyyat

The history of Ahmadiyya in Ghana

Intro
Watch my video on this here.
We estimate that there are about 5000 #ahmadis in all of Ghana by 2020. Most of these people have converted to Ahmadiyya through the Ahmadiyya schools, which also doubles as a  mosque. By 1958, there seems to be only one Ahmadiyya mosque in the entire country (see Foreign Missions). However, the same book lies and claims that there were 100+ mosques controlled by the Ahmadiyya community. However, there were only 1-2 Ahmadi mullahs working the entire country, thus, its a lie. Even today, in 2020, Ahmadiyya sources purposely inflate the amount of mosques which are under ahmadiyya control. We estimate no more than 20 Ahmadiyya mosques in the entire country, and most of the worshippers aren’t even Ahmadi.

In 1997, Mirza Tahir Ahmad confesses that from 1974 to 1991, Ghana would report barely 300 converts per year. He then lies and claims that 200,000 people joined Ahmadiyya from Ghana in 1996. He also confesses to the world how the Ghanian government has been speaking to him behind the scenes for many years. He also revealed how many Ahmadi’s were used in the 1992 elections of Ghana and thus changed the election.
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Ahmadiyya mosques in Ghana

It seems that the first ever Ahmadiyya place of worship is in Saltpond, ahmadiyya sources tell us that it was built in 1949. A picture of it was posted in Foreign Missions. By 1958, there was only one Ahmadiyya mosque. There was a mission house in Accra and in Wa some Muslim mosques may have been taken over.

By 1963, there were 3 areas wherein Ahmadiyya had created communities. First, among the Fante Muslims who were mostly in Saltpond and Accra. In the Kumasi area, Ahmadi’s have gotten converts from Christianity and Islam. Ahmadiyya barely converted any pagans in all of Africa. The 3rd area was in the North-west in Wa. In Wa, there was lots of Muslims who opposed the injection of the Ahmadi’s, however, the British government allowed it and lots of Muslims got converted to Ahmadiyya.

Fisher tells us that by 1963, there were 17 Ahmadiyya circuits, wherein 1 African-imam was places in each circuit as imam. These were imam’s without proper training, Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997) would approve people as he deemed fit. The Pakistani-Ahmadi missionaries were like account managers and managed from the headquarters and also made trips to the different jamaats.

—1963–The Ahmadiyya mosque at Saltpond exists. It seems to be the first ever ahmadiyya mosque.

—1970—Mirza Nasir Ahmad inaugurated the Ahmadiyya Mosque in Mangoase. However, the mosque doesn’t get fully built until 1988.

—1980—Mirza Nasir Ahmad inaugurated the Ahmadiyya mosque in Accra (see Ahmadiyya Mosques Around the World).

—1980—Mirza Nasir Ahmad inaugurated the Ahmadiyya mosque in Essiam (see Ahmadiyya Mosques Around the World).

—1988, Mirza Tahir Ahmad inaugurated the Ahmadiyya mosque in Mangoase, which had been under construction for 17 years.

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Ahmadiyya missionaries in Ghana

In 1936, Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997) was sent to Ghana by the second Khalifa. He went back and forth from Qadiani to Ghana and eventually Rabwah to Ghana. By 1961, he was still the Ahmadiyya Amir and missionary in charge. Fisher tells us that there were barely 3 Pakistani-Ahmadi missionaries working in Ghana in 1963, they were all managed by Maulvi Naseem Saifi.

By 2020, it seems that there are barely 3-4 Ahmadiyya missionaries working in the entire country. There could be more, however, those would only be employed as teachers, not imam’s.  Fisher tells us that by 1963, there were 17 Ahmadiyya circuits, wherein 1 African-imam was places in each circuit as imam. These were imam’s without proper training, Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997) would approve people as he deemed fit. The Pakistani-Ahmadi missionaries were like account managers and managed from the headquarters and also made trips to the different jamaats.

The Amir and Missionary In-charge is Maulana Alhaj Noor Mohammed Bin Salih. It is unclear how many Ahmadiyya missionaries are working underneath him.
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1921

Nayyar sailed from London to Freetown, in Sierra Leone. While in Freetown Nayyar delivered a lecture at a mosque in Fourah Bay, in the east end of the city at the request of the city’s chief Imam.[6] Although at least six people are said to have conveyed their adherence to the Ahmadiyya movement in Sierra Leone as early as 1916 after being influenced by the circulation of Ahmadiyya literature from neighbouring West African nations, no conversions were recorded following Nayyar’s visit.[6]

After the brief Hiatus in Freetown, Nayyar continued towards Saltpond in the Gold Coast where he arrived in March 1921.[3][4] Following a lecture, the Fante community “believed there and then”, following which an oath of allegiance was held.[2] In the history of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, Mahdi Appah, the leader of this group, is regarded as the first Ghanaian to become an Ahmadi Muslim.[7] Despite resistance from northern clerics, the Fante Muslims converted en masse, giving immediate rise to the Ahmadiyya movement in the region.[3][4] Nayyar also toured Accra and Kumase.[5] Having established the movement in the Gold Coast, Nayyar left within a month for Lagos, in Nigeria, before returning again in fall of 1921.
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1923

Abdur Rahim Nayyar was the first Ahmadi mullah sent to British West Africa. Soon after he was sent, the Khalifa at Qadian ordered Al Hajj Fadl-ul-Rahman Hakim to also go to British West Africa and help, thus, Hakim first went to Nigeria (1922). By 1923, Al Hajj Fadl-ul-Rahman Hakim was mostly working out of Ghana as the first permanent missionary to Ghana. He stayed until 1929, at which point he was called back to Qadian. He returned to Ghana in 1933. He seems to have been relieved by another Ahmadi Mullah, Maulana Nazir Ahmad Ali, technically, he spent only the year of 1936 in Ghana and moved over to Sierra Leone, wherein he was the first ever permanent Ahmadi mullah on the scene. Fadl-ul-Rahman worked as the missionary in-charge of Ghana from 1935 to 1947 (See Fisher). Fadl-ul-Rahman died in Pakistan in 1955.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________1927

By 1927, the Community numbered 3,000 across forty localities in the southern regions and the Ashanti Empire. In 1927, an increased missionary outlook was adopted, which facilitated its spread among the Fante people in the south, the Wala people in the north, and the Ashanti people in-between.
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1929

In 1929, Hakim left the colony, only to return again in 1933, for another two years. According to Samwini, the rapid expansion posed a threat to the very existence of Christianity and the Sunni order in the country. Al Hajj Fadl-ul-Rahman Hakim was on this way back to Qadian, he stopped in Nigeria.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________1931

With small number of Muslims being admitted to public schools, the Community petitioned the government, in 1931, to select Muslim members for the government’s board of education.

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1932

The first ever Jalsa Salana is held.

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1936

The Ahmadiyya community sends its first Mullah to the British colony of Ghana. His name was Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________1946

By 1946, there were up to three Indian missionaries and five West African missionaries, and four teachers in the country.
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1949

The first ever Ahmadiyya mosque is built in Saltpond (see video comments at the 22:42 mark).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________1950

A letter was written in 1946 to the Chief Commission of Ashanti, arguing that most rights and privileges are being afforded to Christians. It was not until 1950 that the colonial government first gave permission to establish an Ahmadiyya school in the Ashanti Empire. The T.I. Ahmadiyya Senior High School in Kumasi was founded on January 50, 1950.
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1955

Al Hajj Fadl-ul-Rahman Hakim died in Pakistan.
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1961

Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997) is the Amir and Missionary in-charge.
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1970

The first time ever, the Khalifa, Mirza Nasir Ahmad visited. He visited Accra and Kumasi. He inaugurated the Ahmadiyya Mosque in Mangoase. However, the mosque doesn’t get fully built until 1988.
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1971

While opening the fourth Ahmadiyya hospital in the country in 1971, at Agona SwedruCentral Region, Basharat Ahmad Basir, a leading Ahmadiyya missionary stated that, “opening hospitals and educational facilities in the country was part of the programme of the Movement to regain the lost heritage and glory of Islam.”
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1974

On August 10, 1974, Abdul Wahab Adam was appointed as the Amir (Head) and missionary-in-charge of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Mission of Ghana by the then caliph of the Ahmadiyya movement, Mirza Nasir Ahmad. Adam was the first indigenous Ghanaian to hold this office.[26] In the early part of his ministry, Adam shifted the headquarters of the Ghanaian Ahmadiyya Muslim Community from Saltpond to the capital of the country, Accra. The move came in response to Accra’s growing economic and political influence in the country, which strongly contrasts with Saltpond, a small unknown town in coastal Ghana.

Mirza Tahir Ahmad claims that Abdul Wahab Adam was not good at getting converts. For 20 years he reported only 100-300 converts to Ahmadiyya per year.
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1976

Mirza Masroor Ahmad gets sent to Ghana to manage Ahmadiyya finances. He is stationed at Salaga. He was then made as the principal of the Ahmadiyya Secondary School in Essarkyir, located in the centreal region of Ghana. There he served as principal for four years.
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1980

Mirza Nasir Ahmad visits Ghana and inaugurates 2 mosques, the Ahmadiyya mosque in Accra (see Ahmadiyya Mosques Around the World) and the Ahmadiyya mosque in Essiam (see Ahmadiyya Mosques Around the World). _____________________________________________________________________________________________
1983

Mirza Masroor Ahmad leaves Ghana for good and never returns.
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1988

—Mirza Tahir Ahmad inaugurated the Ahmadiyya mosque in Mangoase, which had been under construction for 17 years.
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1990

Mirza Tahir Ahmad tells us that barely 300 people per year were joining Ahmadiyya from Ghana.
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1992

Mirza Tahir Ahmad tells us that Ahmadi’s were heavily involved in the election. Ahmadi’s were heavily involved in politics in this era also. Ahmadi’s literally monitored the election.
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1996

Mirza Tahir Ahmad lies and claims 200,000 people converted to Ahmadiyya.
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1997

Mirza Tahir Ahmad lies and claims to have had more than 200,000 converts from Ghana. Mirza Tahir Ahmad claims that many Ghanian’s working in government were Ahmadi. He mentions:

1. The speaker of the assembly
2. opposition party leader
3. Deputy Speaker
4. Defense minister
5. Chairman of the ruling party
6. important commission
7.

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2001

Mirza Tahir Ahmad announced 130,000 converts from Ghana to Ahmadiyya (See at the 1:20:00 mark).
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2004

Mirza Masroor Ahmad visits Ghana for the first time in 20 years.
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2020

Barely 1000 converts are announced by Ahmadiyya sources. Even this a lie.

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Links and Related Essay’s

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-the-ahmadi-mullah-nazir-ahmad-mubasher/

http://ahmadiyyamosque.blogspot.com/search/label/Ghana

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/l-b-agusto-was-a-pioneer-member-of-the-ahmadiyya-movement-in-nigeria-but-he-renounced-membership-when-he-realized-that-members-in-southfield-london-believed-founder-ghulam-ahmad-was-a-prophet/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-fadl-ul-rahman-hakim-the-first-permanent-ahmadi-mullah-sent-to-british-west-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/abdur-rahim-nayyars-first-speech-in-british-west-africa-was-at-the-famous-shitta-bey-mosque/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-fadl-ul-rahman-hakim-the-first-permanent-ahmadi-mullah-sent-to-british-west-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/the-3rd-sect-of-ahmadis-were-created-in-lagos-nigeria-in-1922/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_Ghana

Servants of Allah: Maulana Nazir Ahmad Ali Sahib

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/in-1922-the-ahmadiyya-movement-stole-the-adepopo-mosque-from-the-quranic-people-in-lagos-nigeria/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-jibril-martin-1888-1959-the-ahmadi-in-nigeria-who-rejected-the-qadiani-khilafat-and-created-the-3rd-sect-of-ahmadis/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/21/who-is-the-ahmadi-mullah-abdur-rahim-nayyar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-jibril-martin-1888-1959-the-ahmadi-in-nigeria-who-rejected-the-qadiani-khilafat-and-created-the-3rd-sect-of-ahmadis/

Stefan Reichmuth. “Education and the Growth of Religious Associations among Yoruba Muslims: The Ansar-Ud-Deen Society of Nigeria”, Journal of Religion in Africa, Vol. 26, Fasc. 4 (Nov., 1996). p 8.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jibril_Martin

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/professor-humphrey-j-fisher-and-j-spencer-trimingham-called-ahmadiyya-a-maritime-implantation-in-west-africa/

https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/fisher-humphrey-john-1933

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/09/03/early-history-of-ahmadiyya-in-ghana-by-haneef-keelson/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_the_Gambia#cite_note-Fisher126-1

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/06/14/who-is-ghulam-nabi-gilkar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/12/14/did-general-muhammad-zia-ul-haq-join-ahmadiyya-in-the-1940s/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/islam-vs-ahmadiyya-in-nigeria-1975-by-dr-ismail-a-b-balogan-b-a-ph-d-london-university-of-ibadan/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=Balogan

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/10/16/trimingham-j-spencer-the-influence-of-islam-upon-africa-1968/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/01/13/ahmadi-medical-officers-doctors-who-served-in-the-british-military-during-ww-2/

  1. “THE AHMADIYYA MOVEMENT IN NIGERIA”. HARVARD DIVINITY SCHOOL. RETRIEVED SEPTEMBER 19, 2015.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d e Animashaun, Bashir (2012) Jibril Felix Martin (1888 – 1959) and the spread of Western education among Muslims in 20th century Lagos. Ilorin Journal of History and International Studies Vol 3 No 1 2012________________________________________________________________________________________
    Tags#ahmadiyyainafrica #ahmadiyyainwestafrica #ahmadiyyainnigeria #ahmadiyyainlagos #lagos #ahmadiyyainghana #ahmadiyyainsierraleone #Ahmadiyyainbritishwestafrica #ahmadiyyainbritishcolonies #ahmadiyyaviacolonialism #ahmadiyyafactcheckblog #ahmadiyya #ahmadiyyat

 

Muslim TV Ahmadiyya International donated a fully equipped TV studio to the State Broadcaster–GRTS of the Gambia in 2019

Intro
The Ahmadiyya Jamaat has recently (2019) donated a fully equipped TV studio to the State Broadcaster–GRTS of the Gambia in 2019 via their own non-profit company, Muslim TV Ahmadiyya International. They did this as they continue to grease politicians in a corrupt manner so that #ahmadis might get special benefits from the Gambian government.

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The story

#StateHouseToday

A delegation of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jamaat paid a courtesy call on His Excellency President Adama Barrow in Banjul.

The delegation led by the Emir of The Gambia Jamaat, Baba F. Trawally, was accompanied to the presidency by Hon. Minister of Information and Communications Infrastructure, Mr Ebrima Sillah.

The visit followed a donation of a fully equipped TV studio to the State Broadcaster–GRTS, by the Muslim TV Ahmadiyya International.

President Barrow commended the Jamaat for their participation in national development which he said is highly embraced by the government.

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Links and Related Essay’s

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_the_Gambia#cite_note-Fisher126-1

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/06/14/who-is-ghulam-nabi-gilkar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/12/14/did-general-muhammad-zia-ul-haq-join-ahmadiyya-in-the-1940s/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/islam-vs-ahmadiyya-in-nigeria-1975-by-dr-ismail-a-b-balogan-b-a-ph-d-london-university-of-ibadan/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=Balogan

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/10/16/trimingham-j-spencer-the-influence-of-islam-upon-africa-1968/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/01/13/ahmadi-medical-officers-doctors-who-served-in-the-british-military-during-ww-2/
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Tags

#Ahmadiyya #Ahmadiyyainafrica #ahmadiyyainthegambia #ahmadiyyatrueislam #ahmadiapartheid #Ahmadiyyat #rabwah #qadian #meetthekhalifa #ahmadiyyat #muslimsforpeace #ahmadiyyafactcheckblog #nolifewithoutkhalifa #AhmadiyyaPersecution

The history of #Ahmadiyya in Cameroon

Intro
Watch my video on this herein. The Ahmadiyya movement was not given access to the French colony of Cameroon. In fact, the French hated the Ahmadiyya movement and never allowed them into any of their colonies, it was only the British colonies wherein Ahmadiyya was implanted. Nevertheless, per the CIA factbook, by 2018, only 24% of the country is Muslim, who live almost exclusively in the northern area and western area of the country wherein Chad and Nigeria are nearby (and the old islamic trade routes). This area was an old Islamic empire which was broken by the European powers and divided. The dominant Muslim tribe in the north is the Fulani (or Peuhl) ethnic group. In the western region, the Bamoun ethnic group is predominately Muslim. Moreover, the Christian community in Cameroon is mostly in the central and southern region of the country.

It is unclear when the Ahmadiyya community got access to Cameroon, however, it seems to be after 2000. The first Jalsa was held in 2014 (at Foumban, Cameroon, where the first Ahmadiyya mosque is), thus proving that by 2014, there were barely any Ahmadi’s in Cameroon. There are only 2 Ahmadiyya place of worship in the entire country. Those can only hold roughly 500 worshippers each. We estimate that there are barely 500 Ahmadi’s in Cameroon as of 2020. However, unofficial Ahmadiyya sources are claiming that there are 430,000 Ahmadi’s in this country, which is a total lie, in fact, the pew research study that they took this from simply asked 100 Muslims a bunch of questions, of which 12 were Ahmadi. Ahmadi’s took this data and claim that 12% of the Muslim population is Ahmadi, which is total academic dishonesty.
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The Missionary-in-Charge of Jamaat-e-Ahmadiyya in Cameroon Nayyar Abdul Khalique 

A Pakistani, Nayyar Abdul Khalique is the missionary-in-charge for the entire country. There doesn’t seem to be any additional Ahmadi missionaries (See at the 1:10 mark).
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Only two Ahmadiyya place of worship in the whole country of Cameroon

The northern area is solid Muslim, most likely Maliki-Muslims, who have never converted to Ahmadiyya. The first Ahmadiyya place of worship is in Foumban, Cameroon, and just opened in 2019. The second seems to be in Nguti, Cameroon and is called Baitus Salam.

Ahmadiyya place of worship in Foumban
http://ahmadiyyamosque.blogspot.com/search/label/Camaroon

Inauguration of the Ahmadiyya Mosque in Foumban, Cameroon

 

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How did the Europeans defeat the islamic empires?

In the early periods following the arrival of Islam in the region, Muslims were politically active and founded local sultanates. Political structures like the Kanem State and the Bornu Sultanate ruled North Cameroon for decades in the 19th century. These sultanates existed until colonizers began to occupy the region. The northern regions of Cameroon were taken under the control of the Adamawa Emirate, which was subject to the Sokoto Caliphate founded in Northern Nigeria in 1804. Having occupied Cameroon in 1884, the Germans violently oppressed the Muslims who had been in positions of power and diminished their political power in order to consolidate German authority.
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2014

The first ever Jalsa Salana was held in Cameroon, thus proving that there was barely any Ahmadi’s in Cameroon by 2013. 
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2019

The first Ahmadiyya place of worship was opened in Foumban, Cameroon.

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2020

Mirza Masroor Ahmad claims that 13,000 Cameroonians converted to Ahmadiyya in 2019-2020, which is a lie.

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Links and Related Essay’s

https://youtu.be/JQD__IRvn3o

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/08/10/barely-100-americans-converted-to-ahmadiyya-from-july-2019-to-july-2020/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/10/10/the-ahmadiyya-movement-in-nigeria/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/06/03/converts-to-ahmadiyya-in-india-was-5178-from-2008-to-2010-thats-roughly-1726-per-year/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/01/15/are-ahmadis-the-fastest-growing-islamic-sect-the-world-christian-encyclopedia-opened-and-evaluated/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/01/15/are-ahmadis-the-fastest-growing-islamic-sect-the-world-christian-encyclopedia-opened-and-evaluated/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_the_Gambia#cite_note-Fisher126-1

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/06/14/who-is-ghulam-nabi-gilkar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/12/14/did-general-muhammad-zia-ul-haq-join-ahmadiyya-in-the-1940s/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/islam-vs-ahmadiyya-in-nigeria-1975-by-dr-ismail-a-b-balogan-b-a-ph-d-london-university-of-ibadan/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=Balogan

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/10/16/trimingham-j-spencer-the-influence-of-islam-upon-africa-1968/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/01/13/ahmadi-medical-officers-doctors-who-served-in-the-british-military-during-ww-2/

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Tags

#ahmadiyyaincameroon #cameroon #ahmadiyyainafrica #ahmadiyyainwestafrica

#Ahmadiyya #Ahmadiyyainafrica #ahmadiyyainthegambia #ahmadiyyatrueislam #ahmadiapartheid #Ahmadiyyat #rabwah #qadian #meetthekhalifa #ahmadiyyat #muslimsforpeace #ahmadiyyafactcheckblog #nolifewithoutkhalifa #AhmadiyyaPersecution

The history of Ahmadiyya in Uganda

Intro
Watch my video on this here. Per the English-Review of Religions of September-1915 (see page 355) an Ahmadi was living in Kampala, Uganda by the name of Fazl Din, he was a Veterinary Assistant (See Martin also). This Fazl Din mentions about Eid and how many people showed up and he asked them for money to send to Qadian, then he tells us that the British government has given the Ahmadiyya Movement 4000 acres of land to use for a mosque. September-1915, pages 350-357. It seems that the Muslims at this mosque have all quit Ahmadiyya. This mosque seems to have disappeared in the history of Ahmadiyya. By 1947, there was no Ahmadi mosque in modern day Uganda. An Ahmadi missionory, Nur-al-Haq Anwar is sent north to modern day Uganda, which was British-East-Africa by Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad. In 1947, there were only a few indian immigrants who were Ahmadi’s in Uganda, no natives (see Martin). Nur ul Haq only stayed for 2 years, he left for America in 1949. By 1974, Martin reports barely 265 men who were Ahmadi. By 2019-2020, the Khalifa, Mirza Masroor Ahmad claimed that 800 Uganda’s converted to Ahmadiyya in one year, which is a lie.

In 2020, Amir and Missionary In-charge Uganda is Al-Haj Muhammad Ali Kaire. He seems to be a local Ugandan. He also seems to be the first ever local African to be allowed to be fully in-charge by the Ahmadiyya Movement. He is also in-charge of the Ahmadiyya jamaat of Rwanda. In 2020, he admitted that most of the youth had left Ahmadiyya and continue to do so. Interestingly, the origins of Al-Haj Muhammad Ali Kaire are unknown. We don’t know when he became an Ahmadi or any of his history. We do know that in 1973, Idi Amin deported all indians from Uganda, and that’s how and why the Amir and missionary in-charge is a local. In the Ahmadi newspaper, “The East African Times”, they supported Idi Amin and gave loyalty to him, however, they asked that Ahmadi murrabi’s be exempted from deportation. However, this was rejected by the government, only 2 Indian Ahmadi’s were allowed to stay, Mahmood Ahmad, principal of the school, and one of his staff, Munir Ahmad Munib, have remained. The former
is also regarded as the missionary-in-charge of the Ahmadiyya work in the country.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________1927-1928

Commander Dr. Abdul Latif is sent as a medical missionary to Uganda and Kenya, basically East Africa. The other one was Major Dr. M. Shah Nawaz Khan (1899–1977), he was the pioneer Ahmadi Muslim medical missionary to West Africa.
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Ahmadiyya in Uganda, 2020

By 2020, it seems that there are barely 2 Ahmadiyya places of worship in all of Uganda (in the city of Jinja). This is the Aqswa Mosque,Ahmadiyya Muslim Association, Uganda, which seems to have a maximum occupancy of 100. There is one building, which seems to be a mission house and another property. There is another mosque and mission house in Bulenga, Uganda.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Islam in Uganda

By 2014, Muslims make up roughly 14% of the population in Uganda. Of which Ahmadi’s aren’t even in 1%.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Uganda before colonization

It is unclear what role Muslims played in Uganda before the British and others showed up. However, it is clear that there were no Christians in Uganda before 1850. Nevertheless, in 2020, upwards of 85% of the population is Christian.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
The Ahmadiyya beef with Sunni Islam on the coast

The Ahmadiyya community even had a beef with the famous Sunni scholar, Sheikh al-Amin Mazrui (see Martin). al-Amin wrote “Upotofu wa Makadiani”– (Exposing the Qadiani – beliefs commonly called The Ahmadiyya).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1915

Per the English-Review of Religions of September-1915 (see page 355) an Ahmadi was living in Kampala, Uganda by the name of Fazl Din, he was a Veterinary Assistant. This Fazl Din mentions about Eid and how many people showed up and he asked them for money to send to Qadian, then he tells us that the British government has given the Ahmadiyya Movement 4000 acres of land to use for a mosque. September-1915, pages 350-357.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________1934

Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad arrives in the port city of Mombasa (modern day Kenya) he travels inland, all of the coastal cities seem to be heavily influenced by the Shafi Fiqh of Sunni-Islam and thus hostile towards Ahmadiyya. However, in the inland cities, there was less resistance, quite the opposite situation was happening in West Africa (See Fisher). Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad picks Tabora, which falls in modern day Tanzania for his headquarters. The first Ahmadiyya place of worship was opened in 1945 (when WW-2 ended) in Tabora. Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad is the supreme Amir in British-East-Africa and remains as such until 1962.

It should be noted that the Ahmadi’s (Indian immigrants) paid the expenses of this missionary, not the central Jamaat at Qadian, not the new Tehrik-i-Jadid program. In fact, most of the mosques in East and West Africa were either taken over by the Ahmadiyya community (in west africa mostly) or wealthy donations were given from Indian immigrants living in East Africa (see the case of the ahmadiyya mosque in Mombasa).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1935 to 1962

Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad served as Missionary-in-Charge of the Ahmadiyya Muslim missions in East Africa, and established Ahmadiyya Muslim outreach centers in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. During this period, Ahmadiyya mosques were constructed in several East African cities. He translated several Islamic religious books in Swahili; his most memorable achievement being the translation of the Holy Quran and commentary in that language.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________1945

After being the only Ahmadi murrabi in all of British-East-Africa, Nur-al-Haq Anwar is sent from Qadian to help Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1947

Nur-al-Haq Anwar is sent north to modern day Uganda, which was British-East-Africa.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1949

Nur-al-Haq leaves modern day Uganda. The reason is unknown.
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1957

A newspaper was started by the Ahmadiyya jamaat called, “Dobozi iya Obuislamu” (Voice of Islam).

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1958

Per Ahmadiyya sources, “Our Foreign Missions” (1958) there was already an Ahmadi mosque there in Jinja, Uganda. The mosque and land that was given to Ahmadi’s in 1915, seems to have been taken back.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1961

Nur-al-Haq returns to British-East-Africa, it is unknown where he is stationed at.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1962

Uganda gets independence from the British. The Ahmadiyya movement installs their Maulvi, Abdul Karim Sharma at Jinja, Uganda. This seems to be where the greatest concentration of Ahmadi’s are. There doesn’t seem to be any Ahmadi mosques in Kampala (See Martin).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1963

Fisher reports one Ahmadiyya place of worship, in Jinja, Uganda, which is at the source of the Nile River. The Ahmadiyya mosque in Kampala opens, The foundation stone was laid for the mosque in Kampala at the Wandegya roundabout in 1957. This was completed and opened in 1963 with an auspicious ceremony favoured by the presence of Sir Muhammad Zafrullah Khan, an illustrious justice of the International Court of Justice (See Martin).
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1966

The second mosque In the Kampala area, was completed in 1966 at Masaka having been five years in the construction process. This structure is actually located on the crest of Bwala Hill a half mile south of the town itself (see Martin).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1968

Maulvi M.I, Soofi was working in Kenya as the Amir and missionary-in-charge. He was transferred by the Khalifa to Uganda to be the Amir and missionary in-charge, he seems to have been deported by 1972.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1972

Idi amin was in power, he sent all Indian’s home. This is probably why there are still no Pakistani-Ahmadi imams in Uganda.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1974

Martin reports that there are barely 1000 Ahmadi’s in all of Uganda. Of which 265 are men. He also reports of only one mosque in Jinja, whereas there are a few Ahmadi’s on the outskirts of Kampala. The three major urban centres where their work is based are Jinja, Kampala and Masaka. Nine communities have village-type mosques located as follows: Three in the Busoga region at Kasambira on the main road and at three and six-mile distances successively off the main road; four in Mengo region at Mbiko, Buvunya and Seta all on the main road between Jinja and Kampala and also at Nikisanja twelve miles south of Kampala; and finally two in the Masaka region at Kyajubira and Kyotera twelve and twenty-eight miles respectively out of Masaka. In addition there are three communities in the rural areas out of Mbale where the Ahmadis mingle with the Sunnis at the Sunni mosques for Friday prayers praying behind an imam in each instance who has converted to Ahnadiyya. These localities are named: Ndega Buwaohi, Bumboi Hill and Bubirabi.

The remaining hope for the Ahmadiyya work rests within the capacity of the Ugandan missionaries that had propitiously been trained and given experience prior to the Pakistani missionaries’ departure. There are more than a dozen of these probably deployed among the various communities that have already been enumerated. Among them two are noteworthy. Sheikh Al-Haj Ibrahim Semfuma was previously a Sunni sheikh until 194$ when he converted to Ahmadiyyat. He had served lor numerous years as a teacher for the training classes at Jinja. Zekaria Kazito is currently the secretary for the mission residing in Kampala, He is a former member of the Lukiko of Bugand a, is knowledgeable in Arabic and ha.s had experience as a translator. The portion of the Quran that has been published in Luganda is largely the work of Kazito.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1988

The 1st ever Jalsa of Uganda is held.
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2005

For the first time ever, the Khalifa visits Uganda and gives a speech in Urdu, which no one understands.
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2018

Ahmadiyya leaders comment on Ugandan culture.
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2020

The 32nd Jalsa salana is held in Uganda. The Amir and Missionary In-charge Uganda is Al-Haj Muhammad Ali Kaire. He seems to be a local Ugandan. He also seems to be the first ever local African to be allowed to be fully in-charge by the Ahmadiyya Movement. Humanity First is working extensively in Uganda, they recently opened up Masroor Acadamy #Fortportal #Uganda funded by Lajna Ima’illah #Norway @LajnaNorge. @lajna_de @LajnaUK @lajnaau @LajnaCanada @lajnamediausa #Ahmadiyya. Mubiru Haruna seems to be the chairman of Humanity First in Uganda. 

There also seems to be a Jamia in Uganda, they recently had their first group of graduates.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Links and Related Essay’s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFWQJK1yacs

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/09/10/who-is-sheikh-mubarak-ahmad-1910-2001/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/08/10/barely-100-americans-converted-to-ahmadiyya-from-july-2019-to-july-2020/

31st Jalsa Salana Uganda

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/certain-aspects-of-the-ahmadiyya-movement-in-east-africa-with-particular-reference-to-its-religious-practice-and-the-development-of-its-history-and-theology-in-the-east-african-environment-by-earl-r/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/08/10/barely-100-americans-converted-to-ahmadiyya-from-july-2019-to-july-2020/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanzania#Religion

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Africa_Protectorate

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/professor-humphrey-j-fisher-and-j-spencer-trimingham-called-ahmadiyya-a-maritime-implantation-in-west-africa/

https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/fisher-humphrey-john-1933

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/09/03/early-history-of-ahmadiyya-in-ghana-by-haneef-keelson/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_the_Gambia#cite_note-Fisher126-1

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/06/14/who-is-ghulam-nabi-gilkar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/12/14/did-general-muhammad-zia-ul-haq-join-ahmadiyya-in-the-1940s/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/islam-vs-ahmadiyya-in-nigeria-1975-by-dr-ismail-a-b-balogan-b-a-ph-d-london-university-of-ibadan/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=Balogan

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/10/16/trimingham-j-spencer-the-influence-of-islam-upon-africa-1968/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/01/13/ahmadi-medical-officers-doctors-who-served-in-the-british-military-during-ww-2/
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Tags
#britisheastafrica #tanzania #eastafrica #ahmadiyya #ahmadiyyatrueislam #ahmadiapartheid #Ahmadiyyat #rabwah #qadian #meetthekhalifa #muslimsforpeace #ahmadiyyafactcheckblog #nolifewithoutkhalifa #AhmadiMosqueattack #AhmadiyyaPersecution #Mosqueattack #trueislam #atifmian #ahmadiyyainafrica #fisheronahmadiyya #uganda #ahmadiyyainuganda #ahmadiyyainkampala

The history of Ahmadiyya in Kenya

Intro
Watch my video on this here. Kenya was part of British-East-Africa uptil 1962. The Ahmadiyya movement got access to all of British-East-Africa since 1934. Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad was a pioneering missionary to East Africa, as well as South Africa. In 1934, he landed in Mombasa, Kenya (it was British-Kenya at the time)(See Fisher). He served as the missionary in-charge until 1962, he was recalled to Rabwah, which was not Qadian. He picked Tabora, (modern day Tanzania) for his headquarters, he started a press and school, both seem to have shut down by the 1950’s. In 1962, Kenya got its independence from the British and began to be independent (in terms of Ahmadiyya management) from the 2 other East African nations that were created, i.e., Uganda and Tanzania.

In 2020, a Pakistani, Tariq Mahmood Sahib is the Amir and Missionary-in-Charge Kenya.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Before the Portugeuse and British

The Kilwa Sultanate was a medieval sultanate centred at Kilwa, in modern-day Tanzania. At its height, its authority stretched over the entire length of the Swahili Coast, including Kenya. It was said to be founded in the 10th century by Ali ibn al-Hassan Shirazi,[40] a Persian Sultan from Shiraz in southern Iran.[41] However, scholars have suggested that claims of Arab or Persian origin of city-states were attempts by the Swahili to legitimise themselves both locally and internationally.[42][43] Since the 10th century, rulers of Kilwa would go on to build elaborate coral mosques and introduce copper coinage.[44]

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
2020

By 2020, only 10% of the Kenyan population is Muslim, and mostly on the coast. An overwhelming 85% is Christian, this happened as the colonizers arrived. There are most likely barely 3000 Ahmadi’s in the entire country. There seems to be 20 small mosques that are owned by the Ahmadiyya community, mostly empty and barely having an occupancy of 40 worshippers.
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Ahmadi Maulvi’s in Kenya

There has been a succession of seven chief missionaries in Kenya since the mission was formed. Of these only four have served for periods of two years or longer: Sh. N.H. Anwar, Sh. M.I. Soofi, Sh. A,K. Sharma, and Sh. J.R. Rafiq. The last served the longest for a term of three years and seven months. Also during this same period there have been three or four Pakistani missionaries serving continuously in the country (See Martin).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________1915

Per the English-Review of Religions of September-1915 (see page 355) an Ahmadi was living in Kampala, Uganda by the name of Fazl Din, he was a Veterinary Assistant. This Fazl Din mentions about Eid and how many people showed up and he asked them for money to send to Qadian, then he tells us that the British government has given the Ahmadiyya Movement 4000 acres of land to use for a mosque. September-1915, pages 350-357.
______________________________________________________________________________________________
1927-1928

Commander Dr. Abdul Latif is sent as a medical missionary to Uganda and Kenya, basically East Africa. The other one was Major Dr. M. Shah Nawaz Khan (1899–1977), he was the pioneer Ahmadi Muslim medical missionary to West Africa.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1934

Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad arrives in the port city of Mombasa (modern day Kenya) he traveled to Nairobi, and then inland, all of the coastal cities seem to be heavily influenced by the Shafi Fiqh of Sunni-Islam and thus hostile towards Ahmadiyya. However, in the inland cities, there was less resistance, quite the opposite situation was happening in West Africa (See Fisher). Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad picks Tabora, which falls in modern day Tanzania for his headquarters. The first Ahmadiyya place of worship was opened in 1945 (when WW-2 ended) in Tabora. Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad is the supreme Amir in British-East-Africa and remains as such until 1962.

It should be noted that the Ahmadi’s (Indian immigrants) paid the expenses of this missionary, not the central Jamaat at Qadian, not the new Tehrik-i-Jadid program. In fact, most of the mosques in East and West Africa were either taken over by the Ahmadiyya community (in west africa mostly) or wealthy donations were given from Indian immigrants living in East Africa (see the case of the ahmadiyya mosque in Mombasa).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1935 to 1962

Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad served as Missionary-in-Charge of the Ahmadiyya Muslim missions in East Africa, and established Ahmadiyya Muslim outreach centers in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. During this period, Ahmadiyya mosques were constructed in several East African cities. He translated several Islamic religious books in Swahili; his most memorable achievement being the translation of the Holy Quran and commentary in that language.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1945

After being the only Ahmadi murrabi in all of British-East-Africa, Nur-al-Haq Anwar is sent from Qadian to help Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1953

A translation of the Quran into Swahili is published from Nairobi (See Mubarak Ahmad). The Ahmadi Maulvi, Abdul Karim Sharma, was posted in Dar es Salaam (Nairobi) in 1953 at a time when the emnity of Sunni leaders was strong against the Ahmadis.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1954

Construction is started at the first Ahmadiyya mosque, mission house and school in modern day Kenya. In the city of Kisumu, Kenya. The building was made possible largely through the major donation of funds by a leading Ahmadi in the Kisumu community, Mr. A. Ghauri. It was not funded by Tehrik e Jadid. When the Ahmadis proposed to build one in Dar es Salaam having scarcely any funds they found a sympathetic Sunni contractor who agreed to build without payment until after the work was completed. At the time of the laying of the foundation stone rumours were rife with threats against the Ahmadis. A police van with several constables appeared at the site just prior to the ceremony. However, the expected trouble did not materialise. During the process of construction contributions were received from East African Ahmadis, sympathisers from among Sunni Muslims and from members of the Hindu and Sikh communities. These funds were duly paid to the contractor earlier than expected. Sh, Abdul gave oversight to the construction while at the same time functioning as itinerant missionary in certain districts outside of Dar es Salaam such as the Rufiji area.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1955

In less than ten years after Sh, Al-Amin made his oensure against the Ahmadiyya mission taunting them to confront orthodox Islam in places like Mombasa where its bastions were strong the mission was launched in this major port. There has been a continuous presence of Ahmadis in the city since the earliest Ahmadis had arrived at the beginning of railway construction. The community in the first half of the century varied in strength from ten to twenty Asian families with no more than two or three Africans at any given time. In 1955 missionary Sheikh Nur-ud-Din Muneer was posted in Mombasa. His immediate task was to stimulate a favourable response to Ahmadiyyat among Kenyans, to consolidate the community, and to erect a mosque and mission house as a locus for worship and propagation. The generous contribution of Mrs Sayed Meraj—ud—Din in memory of her husband making possible half the cost of the construction programme has al- ready been mentioned.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1956

K. Amri Abedi was the new Ahmadi Maulvi stationed at Darussalam in Nairobi, Kenya. He seems to be working with Sheikh Nur-ud-Din Muneer.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1957

The first  Ahmadiyya mosque opens in modern day Nairobi, Kenya (see Mubarak Ahmad, named Darussalam). Another Ahmadiyya mosque in Mombasa is under construction (Masjid Rehman). The mosque in Kisumu, Kenya opens also. The East African Times was begun in May 1957 in Nairobi by Nur-ud-Din Muneer, the first editor.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1958

The mosque, known as the Masjid Rehman was completed, and opened early in 1958 (See Martin). This is given a brief description by the authors Berg and Walter, referring to it as as:

“””quasi non-communal mosque … erected by the Ahmadiyva, a missionary sect …. Unlike the Sunni non-communal mosque, its presence is more symbolic of contemporary religious trends than of demographic or economic factors at work in the Muslim community””
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
1962

Kenya got independence from the British. The Ahmadiyya community allowed Uganda to operate independently, with management coming directly from Rabwah. However, the Tanzania Ahmadi mission was placed under the administration of Sh. Muhammad Munawwar with the head office in Dar es Salaam (Nairobi). The famous Sheikh Mubarak Ahmad is re-assigned to Rabwah, he thus leaves East Africa to another Ahmadi Maulvi, Sh. Nur- ul-Haq Anwar was installed as the chief missionary for Kenya.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1964

The first ever Jalsa Salana is held.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
1966

Sh. Muhammad Isa, the first missionary posted there, began the work in July, 1966, in the environs of this border town on the Kenya/Tanzania boundary. There are only a very few Ahmadis in the town itself. The work has taken a firm hold in three scattered rural centres nine or ten miles out from Taveta. Small verted from Sunni Islam to become Ahmadis. It was disclosed that the principal reason for this change en masse was the failure of the Sunni association to assist with the construct ion of the mosque. When the Ahmadiyya mission offered to provide the metal roof the Muslim community responded by its concerted willingness to accept Ahmadivyat. Customarily the mission assists in the financing of the construction of indigenous mosques to the extent of one-half of the total cost (which usually provides the metal roofing materials). The Matawa mosque had only recently been completed and ceremonial opened (See Martin).
______________________________________________________________________________________________
1967

In the past the missionary at Kisumu has been responsible for relating to Ahmadis in Eldoret and Nakuru. In 1967 there were seven Asian Ahmadi families in Nakuru. At present there remains no Ahmadi in that city. At Eldoret there have been in past years similarly a few Asian families. Now there are only one or two apart from the community out of the town at Matuma which has already been mentioned.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1974

There were barely 1000 Ahmadi’s (men, women and children) per Martin.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
2018

A new Ahmadiyya mission house and mosque were opened in Luanda, Kenya.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
2020

Mirza Masroor Ahmad didn’t announce any converts to Ahmadiyya from Kenya in 2019-2020 fiscal Ahmadiyya year.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Links and Related Essay’s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzQl2E_WCXs

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/09/10/who-is-sheikh-mubarak-ahmad-1910-2001/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/certain-aspects-of-the-ahmadiyya-movement-in-east-africa-with-particular-reference-to-its-religious-practice-and-the-development-of-its-history-and-theology-in-the-east-african-environment-by-earl-r/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/08/10/barely-100-americans-converted-to-ahmadiyya-from-july-2019-to-july-2020/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanzania#Religion

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Africa_Protectorate

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/professor-humphrey-j-fisher-and-j-spencer-trimingham-called-ahmadiyya-a-maritime-implantation-in-west-africa/

https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/fisher-humphrey-john-1933

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/09/03/early-history-of-ahmadiyya-in-ghana-by-haneef-keelson/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_the_Gambia#cite_note-Fisher126-1

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/06/14/who-is-ghulam-nabi-gilkar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/12/14/did-general-muhammad-zia-ul-haq-join-ahmadiyya-in-the-1940s/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/islam-vs-ahmadiyya-in-nigeria-1975-by-dr-ismail-a-b-balogan-b-a-ph-d-london-university-of-ibadan/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=Balogan

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/10/16/trimingham-j-spencer-the-influence-of-islam-upon-africa-1968/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/01/13/ahmadi-medical-officers-doctors-who-served-in-the-british-military-during-ww-2/
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