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Thorough research work on the Ahmadiyya Movement, #ahmadiyya #ahmadiyyat #ahmadiyyafactcheckblog #messiahhascome

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The history of Ahmadiyya in Grenada

Intro
The Qadiani-Ahmadi’s have a failed mission in Grenada. Per Mirza Mubarak Ahmad’s, “Our Foreign Missions”, he claims that Bashir Ahmad Orchard was sent in the 1950’s. However, he was soon recalled to Rabwah in some type of emergency situation, and the Qadiani-Ahmadi’s never restarted the mission. However, they were close by in Trinidad and Tobago and Suriname.
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Links and Related Essay’s

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2021/02/21/the-history-of-ahmadiyya-in-trinidad-and-tobago/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2021/02/12/the-history-of-ahmadiyya-in-suriname/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/11/25/bashir-ahmad-orchard-the-first-non-desi-ahmadi-imam/
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Tags

#grenada #ahmadiyyaingrenada #ahmadiyyainthecaribbean

Abdullah R. Scott, the first ever scottish Ahmadi and his visit to Qadian in 1931

Intro
In 1931, a scottish ex-military person named Abdullah R. Scott converted to Ahmadiyya, he even visited Qadian and gave his thoughts in the ROR. He arrived in Qadian 9th May 1931 and stayed for two months. He seems to have quit Ahmadiyya soon thereafter. Bashir Ahmad Orchard was another englishman who joined and became an imam, as is Ibrahim Noonan. He mentions the Noor hospital and how his son was sick and was admitted. He claims that Qadiani is barely 2 square miles and has a population of 7000. The ROR of Jan-Fen-1920 has reported that there were 2500 Ahmadi’s living in Qadian in early 1920. In the 1970’s, a professor, Muhammad Aslam reported that there were 1300 Ahmadi’s living in Qadian.

Continue reading “Abdullah R. Scott, the first ever scottish Ahmadi and his visit to Qadian in 1931”

The history of Ahmadiyya in Ireland

Intro
Some sources claim that the Community was formally registered in the country in 1992, during the era of the Fourth Caliphate. However, “Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around The World”, claims that the Jamaat was established in 2001. Nevertheless, the history of Ahmadiyya in Ireland started when Bashir Ahmad Orchard converted to Ahmadiyya in the late 1940’s. He began working in Ireland from 1949–1952 and later 1966–1983. Bashir Ahmad Orchard was dead by 2002. Ibrahim Noonan was sent to Ireland to attempt to make progress in the early 2000’s.

There is only one Ahmadiyya mosques in the country. The majority of the members are of South Asian origin. Ireland consisted of five jamaats, with a total of 467 Ahmadis. About 40% of the Ahmadis in Ireland reside in Galway. There are an estimated 60 members who are under asylum in the country, a third of which are under asylum in Galway. Besides, Galway and Dublin, the Community has members in CorkLimerick, and a number of smaller towns and cities across Ireland. There are two Ahmadiyya mosques in Ireland, one in Galway in the western coast, and in Lucan near the eastern coast in County Dublin. The first ever Jalsa salana was held in 2002.

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A Tahrik-e-Jadid pamphlet published in the late 1960’s-early 1970’s

Intro
We have found a Tahrik-e-Jadid pamphlet published in the late 1960’s-early 1970’s by Nur ud Din Muneer, (M.A.). It was published from Rabwah, and under the guidance of Mirza Mubarak Ahmad, who was working as the “Secretary Ahmadiyya Muslim Foreign Missions” and this is a Tabshir Publication. Mirza Mubarak Ahmad also wrote “Our Foreign Missions” (1961) in this same era.

On the second page, the Ahmadiyya Movement published MGA’s famous “Ahmadiyya will convert the whole world prophecy”, wherein it references “Tadhkiratu-Shahadatain” (1903) and MGA’s famous prophecy that Ahmadiyya will take over the world. MGA even wrote that it would take 300 years.

We have posted it in the below, this is an extremely detailed pamphlet which talks about the growth of Ahmadiyya in Japan, Singapore, West Africa, it even mentions Bashir Ahmad Orchard, the first ever Irish-Ahmadi and first ever Irish Mullah.

Continue reading “A Tahrik-e-Jadid pamphlet published in the late 1960’s-early 1970’s”

Bashir Ahmad Orchard, the first non-desi-Ahmadi-imam


Intro

Dear readers, we have recently covered some of the non-pakistani-imams that were rushed through Jamia and even though they failed, were made imam’s by the Ahmadi Khalifa. Bashir Ahmad Orchard, previously known as John Bren Orchard (April 26th, 1920 – July 8th, 2002), seems to be their first ever indigenous European Ahmadiyya Missionary, he was born in Torquay, England and thus became the first ever English-Ahmadi-missionary. His brother was a Roman Catholic priest. But to the astonishment of his fellow officers, he began to take instruction in Ahmadiyya. For Bashir Orchard, after the war, there were no prospects, things were bad and rationing of the basic food, Britain was devastated by the german bombing and overall war effort, there was rubble everywhere, things were not looking good for him. Joining Ahmadiyya was a good situation, where he got a super-young desi- woman, employment and comfy life.

He was sent off as a missionary by the 2nd Khalifa, however, he didn’t pass Jamia or any other islamic school, the Khalifa waived all of that and made Bashir Ahmad Orchard a Murrabi nevertheless. He was given an important young Ahmadi woman, in fact, Orchard became a brother-in-law of the Khalifa since he married the only sibling of the Khalifa’s first wife.

His preaching was very unsuccessful, his son even admitted as much, both in Scotland and Guyana. He seems to have been specifically used as the token English-Ahmadi and was marketed as such. He also claimed to be a recipient of divine revelations and true dreams.

When he died in 2002, the ROR wrote the story of his life and conversion. Bashir Ahmad Orchard interviewed. His children interviewed.
Continue reading “Bashir Ahmad Orchard, the first non-desi-Ahmadi-imam”

Who is James Sinclair? @pray_to_one

Intro
A major strategy of the Ahmadiyya Movement is to market their white converts. James Sinclair is wrapped up in a similar situation. Since he was white, he was given special treatment by the Ahmadiyya elite in Canada. James Sinclair ( on twitter as @pray_to_one) is native Canadian who converted to Ahmadiyya, via a love affair with an Ahmadi girl about 10 years ago (listen to an ahmadi imam, Afzal Mirza discussing the issue of fake convert marriages in Canada). He was immediately pushed by Ahmadi leaders to begin working as a spokesman or marketing manager of sorts for the Ahmadiyya Movement in Canada, this is most likely through the Waqf-e-Ardhi program. It is rumored that they paid his rent and gave him lots of perks. This isn’t a new process. In Ireland, Ibrahim Noonan (@ImamNoonan) is the token-white-convert who was made an imam without even going to Jamia. He also converted to Ahmadiyya while in love with an Ahmadi girl. He was able to avoid child support payments for 10+ years. Bashir Ahmad Orchard was the token white guy before Noonan. Noonan worked at a bar for many years and had a fetish for brown girls. In Germany, there is another token white guy, Abdullah Wagishauser who was a hippy, he converted to ahmadiyya and got a job. Abdullah Wagishauser is 1 of 9 trustees who manage the daily operations of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jamaat International (AMJI). Damon Stengel is another.

He has also been working in Belize on behalf of the Ahmadiyya Movement. He also seems to own a cell phone repair shop and was in Belize teaching course on cell phone repair a few years ago.

Continue reading “Who is James Sinclair? @pray_to_one”

The history of Ahmadiyya in Trinidad and Tobago

Intro
Ahmadiyya arrived in Trinidad and Tobago in 1952 (see mosques around the world). Our Foreign Missions (by Mirza Mubarak Ahmad) states that the Ahmadiyya mission was started in 1950. The first Ahmadiyya missionary sent to the island was Maulana Muhammad Ishaque Saqui. The Lahori-Ahmadi’s are also on the island and have had a jamaat for some years, they were also nearby in Guyana. By 2021, we estimate no more than 200 Ahmadi’s on the entire island. In 2021, the Amir of Trinidad and Tobago is Maulana Ibrahim bin Yaqub, he has been the Amir since 1991 when Mirza Tahir Ahmad appointed him after the death of Maulana Muhammad Ishaque Saqui, who had served as Amir and missionary-in-charge for almost 40+ years (Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around The World – A Pictorical Presentation. Ahmadiyya Muslim Community; Khilafat Centenary Edition. 2008. ISBN 978-1882494514). Maulana Ibrahim Bin Yacoob was appointed as Amir and Missionary -in-charge from 1991 to present day (2022).
Underneath him is Maulana Talib Yacoob (who is a native of Trinidad and Tobago), and he served in Trinidad from 2004–2020 (when he died).
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The 1947 Qadiani-Ahmadi Jalsa in Lahore, Pakistan and Qadian, India

Intro
After the biggest massacre of Ahmadi’s ever in Ahmadiyya history (during partition, 1947), the Qadiani-Ahmadi’s settled in Lahore and organized the first ever Qadiani Jalsa in Pakistan. On 16 December 1947, the Khalifa announced during the Friday Sermon that just as the Jalsa Qadian would continue as normal, a zilli Jalsa [meaning in reflection of the original] would be held in Lahore on 27 and 28 December 1947, which was to be preceded by the Shura on the 26 December.

Thus, there were 2 Jalsa’s in the Punjab. Per Ahmadiyya sources, the Jalsa at Qadian was attended by 315 individuals of which 62 were Sikh and non-Ahmadi Muslim guests.
Continue reading “The 1947 Qadiani-Ahmadi Jalsa in Lahore, Pakistan and Qadian, India”

The history of the Ahmadiyya Movement in British-Guyana

Intro
Ahmadiyya sources tell us that a man named Mohammad Sharif Bakhsh sent a letter to Qadian and accepted Ahmadiyya in 1956. Bashir Ahmad Orchard was sent soon thereafter to investigate.

By 2021, there are barely 200 members of the Ahmadiyya Community in Guyana. However, the Lahore Ahmadiyya movement is also active in Guyana, for which figures are unavailable at the moment. Thus, a figure of 200 is unlikely to be representative of the total Ahmadiyya population. There is one Qadiani-Ahmadi place of worship, its the Bait un Noor, its unclear when it opened, seems like 1995. 

Continue reading “The history of the Ahmadiyya Movement in British-Guyana”

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