Intro
Not to be confused with Maulvi Mubarak Ali, who was from Sialkot and who’s father was MGA’s teacher. This Maulvi Mubarak Ali was a Bengali man (born in 1881) who left Islam and joined Ahmadiyya in 1909. He ended up becoming the pioneer missionary sent to Germany. In Germany he faced lots of opposition from Muslims, who called Ahmadi’s agents of the British and scoffed at the Ahmadiyya attempt to build a mosque. The Ahmadiyya Movement was claiming to have substantial money on-hand to pay for the building of the Ahmadiyya temple. Later in the year 1923, Malik Ghulam Farid also arrived with his wife and young son in Berlin to support Maulvi Mubarak Ali. In 1924, both missionaries published a booklet called Refuting the Allegation that the Members of the Ahmadiyya Movement are a Spearhead of British Imperialism, in which they replied to the attacks of opponents such as Mansur Rifat. Maulvi Mubarak Ali and Malik Ghulam Farid left Germany. Both had also attended the famous Wembley Conference of Religions in 1924, and Maulvi Mubarak Ali left at the end of the same year. He went back to India where he pursued a successful career as a teacher. He was later appointed the Amir of the Bengal province and is to this date held in high esteem as a result of his piety. The German Mission itself was closed due to a lack of funds; a decision made after a discussion in the Majlis-e-Shura [Consultative Body of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community] of 1924. It was decided that for the time being, London should be established as the main European Mission.

The Ahmadiyya temple project was totally cancelled. For 30 years, there would be no Ahmadiyya temple in Germany. However, the Lahori-Ahmadi’s got theirs built. The Qadiani-Ahmadi mullahs also left Germany and didn’t return for 30 years. It should be noted that the Lahori-Ahmadi’s were able to start their Berlin Mosque in 1923 and officially open it in 1925.

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______________________________________________________________________________________________1881
https://www.reviewofreligions.org/13007/the-berlin-mosque-plan-of-1923/

Per Ahmadiyya sources, he was was born in 1881 in Digdair, Bengal.

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1895–1905
https://www.reviewofreligions.org/13007/the-berlin-mosque-plan-of-1923/

After completing his studies at Presidency College, he joined the Teachers Training College in Dhaka to receive a B.A in teaching and education.
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1905
https://www.reviewofreligions.org/13007/the-berlin-mosque-plan-of-1923/

In 1905, his first contact with Ahmadiyyat was made through the study of The Review of Religions.
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1909-1913
https://www.reviewofreligions.org/13007/the-berlin-mosque-plan-of-1923/

He visited Qadian and accepted Ahmadiyyat in the era of the first Caliph and then-Worldwide Supreme Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community,  Maulvi Noor-ud-din. In the latter part of 1913, he took a one-year leave of absence and traveled to Qadian where he also worked on the English translation of the Holy Qur’an.
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1919-1922

In 1919, he received instructions from Mirza Bashir-Ud-Din Mahmud Ahmad to proceed to Nigeria via London. As his jouney to Nigeria was delayed for various reasons, it was decided that he should remain in London and work there, until 1922.
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1922
https://www.alhakam.org/a-letter-to-maulvi-mubarak-ali/
Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around The World – A Pictorical Presentation. Ahmadiyya Muslim Community; Khilafat Centenary Edition. 2008. ISBN 978-1882494514.

He was finally sent to Berlin. At that time, Berlin was a very cosmopolitan and international city, where  intellectuals from different parts of the world resided. Germany itself was still suffering from the aftermath of the First World War. After losing the war, significant political changes occurred. The monarchy was abolished and a democratic republic was declared. This era of German history is known as the era of the Weimar Republic. German foreign policy was still hostile towards the victorious powers. Hence, anti-British revolutionaries from the British colonies were warmly welcomed into the city, amongst whom many were Muslims. In these turbulent times, Maulvi Mubarak Ali arrived in Berlin with the aim of spreading the message of Islam in this part of Europe. He first took residence in Charlottenburg, a thriving and international borough of the city, in Dahlmannstresse 9. Two other Ahmadis, brothers Dr. Attaullah and Abdullah Butt, who were probably pursuing their studies, also resided in Berlin in the Hannoversiche Str. 1 near the Charité hospital. All three appear in the list of attendees of the meeting of the Islamic Society of Berlin in November 1922. Shortly after arriving, Maulvi Mubarak Ali succeeded in purchasing a piece of land near the tram station of Witzleben, which was at that time an agricultural land.

He bought it for £200 on 16th of February 1923. The architect K.A Hermann was assigned by Maulvi Mubarak Ali to design the mosque and after receiving the required permission, the excavation work for the mosque started on Friday, 27th July, 1923.

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1923
Mirza Bashir-ud-Din Mahmud Ahmad, “Friday Sermon of 27 July 1923,” Khutubat-e Mahmud Vol. 8 (Qadian), 146-147.

After purchasing the land for £200 on 16th of February 1923. The architect K.A Hermann was assigned by Maulvi Mubarak Ali to design the mosque and after receiving the required permission, the excavation work for the mosque started on Friday, 27th July, 1923.

Precisely at the same time, Mirza Bashir-Ud-Din Mahmud Ahmad, second Khalifah and then-Worldwide Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, was delivering the Friday sermon in Qadian, in which he said about the Berlin mosque:

“How thankful we should be that in this short period, the weak and small part of a small community has collected the required amount and the construction of the mosque has started. I am mentioning this because I had written to be informed when the excavation work for the foundation starts, so that the Jama’at could pray for this work. Today a telegram came which stated, that at 9 o´clock Berlin time the excavation work would start. As the day there starts much later than here, 9 o´clock Berlin time means that at this time of Juma, is 9 o´clock there. Which means that the excavation work is just now being done. As this is the time of acceptance of prayers, I request the Jama’at to pray that God may bless this work and may Islam spread there stronger than Christianity did.”
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Mosque Drawings

 

This drawing by the architect was published in the German newspaper Vossische Zeitung in August of 1923. The caption at the bottom of the picture reads, “The new face of Berlin: the first Mosque in Berlin W at the Kaiserdamm. Designed by architect Hermann.”

When we consider the blueprints of the mosque, it becomes evident what a tremendous and ambitious plan had been launched by Hazrat Mirza Bashir-Ud-Din Mahmud Ahmara, the Second Khalifah. It would have probably been the biggest mosque of the Jama’at at that time. The mosque had huge proportions; the minarets were approximately 60 metres high and a hostel for students was planned for construction in addition to multiple  rooms for students and staff in the main building. In addition, a restaurant and shops had been proposed for inclusion on the ground floor. The mosque itself was on the second floor, bearing a huge dome of 13 metres in  diameter. The costs for the mosque was estimated at £2500.13 As stated earlier, the money for this project was collected in a relatively short period of time, by the women of the Ahmadiyya community. The speeches of Hazrat Mirza Bashir-Ud-Din Mahmud Ahmadra, the Second Khalifah, and the reports published in the Al-Fazal newspaper during those years, spoke volumes of the great sacrifices of the poor Ahmadi women of India. Hazrat Mirza Bashir-Ud-Din Mahmud Ahmadra, second Khalifah and then-Worldwide Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community instructed the following words to be displayed on the mosque:

“This mosque is donated by the Ahmadi women for their new Muslim brothers.”14

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Muslim opposition to the Ahmadiyya place of worship

The Berlin Mosque Plan of 1923

“The Indian national Mubarak Ali has purchased some months ago at Kaiserdamm a plot to build a mosque. He seems to have significant funds. The above mentioned is a representative of the sect of Ahmad the Qadiani, the founder of the reformist sect — named, after him, the Ahmadiyya Movement —among the Indian Muslims. The Muslims living in Germany dislike strongly Mubarak Ali and his friends, because he is seen in Muslim circles as an agent of the British government […] As we have learned from confidential sources, the local Muslims intend to counter rally on the 6th of this month during the foundation-laying ceremony. Therefore, it is strongly discouraged that representatives of the government take part in this ceremony or that the invitation of Mubarak Ali to the foreign ministry is answered.”17


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1924In 1924, both missionaries published a booklet called Refuting the Allegation that the Members of the Ahmadiyya Movement are a Spearhead of British Imperialism, in which they replied to the attacks of opponents such as Mansur Rifat. Before that a letter written by  Khalifatul Masih II to Mubarak Ali refuting these accusations had already been published in the Al-Fazal of 21st September 1923. In 1924, another small booklet about the beliefs of the Jama’at entitled  Ahmadiyya Movement or “Pure Islam” was published by Mubarak Ali. These were the first Ahmadiyya publications in Germany.The mosque project eventually fell victim to the hyperinflation which devastated the German economy in the year 1923. The walls had already reached a height of 2.5 metres, when the construction stopped. In early 1925 the constructed walls were demolished, due to an alteration of the plan by the company Hausgemeinschaft Witzleben GmbH. This company also ran out of money after the basic structure of the building had been constructed. Consequently, the site was sold off in a compulsory auction in July 1926. It was then bought by Charlottenburger Baugenossenschaft. Even today, apartment buildings of this company stand at the spot. Maulvi Mubarak Ali and Malik Ghulam Farid left Germany. Both had also attended the famous Wembley Conference of Religions in 1924, and Maulvi Mubarak Ali left at the end of the same year. He went back to India where he pursued a successful career as a teacher. He was later appointed the Amir of the Bengal province and is to this date held in high esteem as a result of his piety. The German Mission itself was closed due to a lack of funds; a decision made after a discussion in the Majlis-e-Shura [Consultative Body of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community] of 1924. It was decided that for the time being, London should be established as the main European Mission.
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Links and Related Essay’s

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/10/19/a-brief-history-of-the-lahori-ahmadi-mission-germany-1922-2017/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin_Mosque

Who is Maulvi Mubarak Ali? The son of MGA’s teacher

https://www.alhakam.org/a-letter-to-maulvi-mubarak-ali/

The Berlin Mosque Plan of 1923

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2021/07/12/who-is-malik-ghulam-farid/

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