Intro
This is a copy and paste job from this book, pages 290–292.

Link—https://lubpak.com/archives/317821

The Data

In June, 1948 Mirza Mahmud set up Furqan Battalion to axe his grind in Kashmir affairs. In a special session of Majlis-i-Shoora, he announced that he had been persuaded by some military officers to send at least a platoon on Jammu front to take part in Kashmir war. Under the command of Mirza Mubarak Ahmad, a platoon of 45 Ahmadis, after receiving instructions from M.M.Ahmad, then Deputy Commissioner Sialkot, moved to MirajKay to fight on the Jammu front. The Government of Pakistan, claims an Ahmadi weekly paper Lahore, itself requested Mirza Mahmud to send a Battalion on Kashmir front. An Organizing Committee under Mirza Nasir Ahmad (Fatehuddin) was set up which recruited Ahmadi volunteers and by June 1948 the Furqan Battalion, under the command of Col. (Retd.) Sardar Muhammad Hayat Qasarani was formed which stationed at Sarai Alamgir near Jhelum. After Qaisarani, Mirza Mubarak Ahmad became its commander. The Furqan camp was named Zubir and the commanding officer was called ‘Alam Kabab’, (a name revealed to Mirza Ghulam Ahmad for the future Muslih Maud, Mirza Mahmud claimed that ‘office’ in 1944). Besides Col. Qaisarani, Maj. Waqi-uz-Zaman (Second in Command), Major Hameed Ahmad Kaleem, Major Abdul Hamid, Major Abdullah Mahar and Cap. Naimatullah Sharif occupied important positions in the Battalion.

The Battalion advanced from Baghsar front to the Valley of Saadabad on 10 July 1948 and occupied a portion of it about miles wide and 5 miles long when the cease-fire took place. Nine Ahmadis were killed during Kashmir war.74 As the war was going on, Mirza Mahmud summoned some influential Ahmadis to Lahore to start a movement inside the Valley. Khalifa Abdul Manan, the son of Khalifa and an engineer by profession, was called to Lahore and advised to contact some one in the Valley to help in the execution of the Ahmadi plan. He states:

He (Mirza) then said: ‘I want reliable person from the Valley who should be available for operation on the fighting line to’… ‘I (Mannan) at once said: yes, Your Holiness! I have one in mind, but he is presently in Srinagar “Can he come”? He inquired and I said ‘yes’, “but I have no means to communicate with him.” ‘You write him and give me the letter.’ I wrote, the message reached him in Srinagar, he left in disguise immediately. He was under orders of arrest from the Emergency Administration. He reached Lahore within a few days, presented himself at Rattan Bagh and started the assigned work and continued to work for years and year.” 75

Furqan Force concentrated its activities mostly in the Saadabad Valley Sector. It was a spy rather than a fighting force. The leaders of the Muslim Conference expressed their apprehensions on the Ahmadi involvement in Kashmir affairs. Sardar Aftab Ahmad, General Secretary, Muslim Conference, condemned the Ahmadi role in Kashmir war and held them responsible for spying and playing an Imperialist inspired game.76

Mirza Mahmud, in his address dated 27 December 1950 states:

‘Sardar Aftab Ahmad, General Secretary Muslim Conference Kashmir, has alleged that Ahmadis had sent the Furqan Force to fight in Kashmir as a part of a conspiracy. They leaked secret reports to the Indian Army. On the basis of their reports the enemy war planes bombarded Pakistan’s strategic positions. All the leading newspapers of the Punjab carried his statement. We made a complaint to the Government stating ‘Why did Government allow us to remain in Kashmir for two years’? The Government asked Sardar Aftab to retract and the Ministry of Kashmir prepared a draft statement and sent it to Karachi to contradict his earlier statement. But Sardar Aftab’s statement appeared in distorted form only in least circulated daily Tamir, Rawalpindi. After sometimes in November 1950 Sardar Aftab repeated the same allegations on the arrival of Sir Owen Dixon mission in Pakistan as mediator on Kashmir question although the volunteer forces had been withdrawn from Kashmir by that time.’77

The Furqan Battalion was disbanded on 17 June 1950. Brig K.M.Sheikh of Pak Army read out the message of Gen Gracey, C-in-C of the Battalion to the Furqan Force in a ceremony held for that special purpose:

Gracey paid a glowing tribute to Furqan Battalion in his message dated 17 June 1950. The text of the message to the Battalion from the notorious General Sir Douglas Gracey, K.C.I.C.B.E., M.C., Commander in Chief (Furqan Battalion) is given below:

“Your offer to provide a volunteer force in the fight for liberation of Kashmir in June, 1948 was gratefully accepted, and the Furqan Bn came into being. After a short period of training during the summer of 1948, you were soon ready to take your place in the field. In September 1948 you were placed under Commander MALF. Your Bn was composed entirely of volunteers who came from all walks of life, young peasants, students, teachers, men in business, they were all imbued with the spirit of service for Pakistan; you accepted no renumeration, and no publicity for the self sacrifice for which you all volunteered. Yours was a noble cause.You impressed us all with your keenness to learn, and the enthusiasm you brought with you. You and your officers soon got over many difficulties that face a young unit.In Kashmir you were allotted an important sector, and very soon you justified the reliance placed on you and you nobly acquitted yourself in battle against heavy enemy ground and air attacks, with not losing a single inch of ground.

Your conduct both individual and collective and your discipline have been of a very high order.

As your mission is over and your Bn is under orders to disband. I wish to thank every one of you for the services you have rendered to your country. Khuda Hafiz.” 78

 74 Weekly Lahore, Lahore 31 March, 1975 Also Tarikh-i-Ahmadiyyat, Vol VI, P.267]

75 Khalifa Abdul Mannan, Kashmir Story, Lahore 1970 P. 120
76 Shamsul-ulema Mufti Atique Ullah Shah Mufti-I-Azam Poonch, Azad Kashmir Mein Kay Hath Kanday, Supplement the Sadiq Azad Kashmir, 5 January, 1951 P.16
77 Mirza Mahmud Ahmad’s Address dated 27 December, 1950 Publicity Department, Rabwah
78 Tarikh-i-Ahmadiyyat, Vol. VI, P.675

http://alhafeez.org/rashid/british-jewish/bjc_17.htm