He was born in 1853, and was the eldest surviving son, and legal successor, to the estate of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad. Despite the fact that the father disinherited him in the 1880s as a reprisal for non-cooperation in the father’s quest to marry Muhammadi Begum, the book The Punjab Chiefs show him as the inheritor of the Qadian estate.

Mirza Sultan Ahmad eventually married his cousin, the daughter of Imam ud Din

Dard’s comments, see page 704:

“””Sultan Ahmad’s first wife has died and his present wife is the daughter of Imam Din, and his sister is Sultan Ahmad’s aunt. It is this aunt of Sultan Ahmad,who is Imam Din’s sister, that stops our people in conspiracy with Imam Din. I have also heard her with my own ears. Imam Din’s sister has said within my own hearing; “These people are the enemies of my brothers, Imam Din and Nizam Din. I am allied to my brothers, I do not want them to take water from this well, stop them.” I have heard her say so many times. Sultan Ahmad is against me. One reason for this is that he was adopted as a son by Mirza Ghulam Qadir and thus made a sharer of half of my property. It is therefore to his interest that he keeps with his aunt. The Ishtihar which the
defendant exhibits, dated May 2nd, 1891, is mine.”””

Mirza Sultan Ahmad was the family representative to the British Govt.  

In 1904, Mirza Sultan Ahmad’s only sibling, Mirza Fazl Ahmad, died

1906, Mirza Sultan Ahmad’s son joins Ahmadiyya, and MGA calls his grandmother a prostitute

It is interesting to note the Mirza Sultan Ahmad’s son, Aziz Ahmad, seems to have become ahmadi in Feb 1906.   As per Ahmadiyya records…then they quickly fabricated up a dream of MGA to this effect:

“””The said dream has been published with a symbolic interpretation. He said clearly that he had seen ‘Aziz Ahmad son of Mirza Sultan Ahmad. (al-Hakam, March 10, 1906 page 1)”””

Mirza Sultan Ahmad’s son, Mirza Aziz Ahmad

His career
Mirza Sultan had a very successful career as a senior government administrator, rising to be Deputy Commissioner during the British Raj. The record of how he managed riots in the Punjab in the absence of the British administrator is quite flattering.  In 1916, he is recorded as being Additional District Magistrate in Lahore (Paigham Sulh, 23 January, 1916, a Lahori periodical).

In addition to his career, he was also considered a distinguished literary figure in Lahore and is mentioned in several journals of the area.

He tried his best to stay at a distance from the religion founded by his father, and was never a member of his organisation, which was headed by his younger brother, Mirza Mahmud Ahmad, during the 1920s.

In the 1916 article mentioned above, he categorically and eloquently wrote:

“All the prophets gave good news of the coming of our Prophet, and our Prophet gave the good news of hundreds among his own followers who arose in Islam as abdal, aqtab, auliya [saints] and mujaddids [reformers]. … Prophethood was ended and spiritual benefits were made general in another form.”

At his deathbed 1931, when he was not in full control of his faculties, his wife was manipulated by the leadership of the Qadiani Ahmadiyya into signing an affidavit that Mirza Sultan Ahmad had been initiated into the Qadiani organisation on his deathbed.  It would be highly unbecoming of an established well-grounded person like him to have had a deathbed conversion.


Also see here: http://ahmediorg.yuku.com/topic/3613/Did-Mirza-Sultan-Ahmad-join-Ahmadiyyat#.WHlMe1MrIdU

See here: http://wiki.qern.org/mirza-ghulam-ahmad/biography/family-and-progeny/mirza-sultan-ahmad