Intro
Watch my video on this here.
We estimate that there are about 5000 #ahmadis in all of Ghana by 2020. Most of these people have converted to Ahmadiyya through the Ahmadiyya schools, which also doubles as a  mosque. By 1958, there seems to be only one Ahmadiyya mosque in the entire country (see Foreign Missions). However, the same book lies and claims that there were 100+ mosques controlled by the Ahmadiyya community. However, there were only 1-2 Ahmadi mullahs working the entire country, thus, its a lie. Even today, in 2020, Ahmadiyya sources purposely inflate the amount of mosques which are under ahmadiyya control. We estimate no more than 20 Ahmadiyya mosques in the entire country, and most of the worshippers aren’t even Ahmadi.

In 1997, Mirza Tahir Ahmad confesses that from 1974 to 1991, Ghana would report barely 300 converts per year. He then lies and claims that 200,000 people joined Ahmadiyya from Ghana in 1996. He also confesses to the world how the Ghanian government has been speaking to him behind the scenes for many years. He also revealed how many Ahmadi’s were used in the 1992 elections of Ghana and thus changed the election.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Ahmadiyya mosques in Ghana

It seems that the first ever Ahmadiyya place of worship is in Saltpond, ahmadiyya sources tell us that it was built in 1949. A picture of it was posted in Foreign Missions. By 1958, there was only one Ahmadiyya mosque. There was a mission house in Accra and in Wa some Muslim mosques may have been taken over.

By 1963, there were 3 areas wherein Ahmadiyya had created communities. First, among the Fante Muslims who were mostly in Saltpond and Accra. In the Kumasi area, Ahmadi’s have gotten converts from Christianity and Islam. Ahmadiyya barely converted any pagans in all of Africa. The 3rd area was in the North-west in Wa. In Wa, there was lots of Muslims who opposed the injection of the Ahmadi’s, however, the British government allowed it and lots of Muslims got converted to Ahmadiyya.

Fisher tells us that by 1963, there were 17 Ahmadiyya circuits, wherein 1 African-imam was places in each circuit as imam. These were imam’s without proper training, Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997) would approve people as he deemed fit. The Pakistani-Ahmadi missionaries were like account managers and managed from the headquarters and also made trips to the different jamaats.

—1963–The Ahmadiyya mosque at Saltpond exists. It seems to be the first ever ahmadiyya mosque.

—1970—Mirza Nasir Ahmad inaugurated the Ahmadiyya Mosque in Mangoase. However, the mosque doesn’t get fully built until 1988.

—1980—Mirza Nasir Ahmad inaugurated the Ahmadiyya mosque in Accra (see Ahmadiyya Mosques Around the World).

—1980—Mirza Nasir Ahmad inaugurated the Ahmadiyya mosque in Essiam (see Ahmadiyya Mosques Around the World).

—1988, Mirza Tahir Ahmad inaugurated the Ahmadiyya mosque in Mangoase, which had been under construction for 17 years.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Ahmadiyya missionaries in Ghana

In 1936, Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997) was sent to Ghana by the second Khalifa. He went back and forth from Qadiani to Ghana and eventually Rabwah to Ghana. By 1961, he was still the Ahmadiyya Amir and missionary in charge. Fisher tells us that there were barely 3 Pakistani-Ahmadi missionaries working in Ghana in 1963, they were all managed by Maulvi Naseem Saifi.

By 2020, it seems that there are barely 3-4 Ahmadiyya missionaries working in the entire country. There could be more, however, those would only be employed as teachers, not imam’s.  Fisher tells us that by 1963, there were 17 Ahmadiyya circuits, wherein 1 African-imam was places in each circuit as imam. These were imam’s without proper training, Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997) would approve people as he deemed fit. The Pakistani-Ahmadi missionaries were like account managers and managed from the headquarters and also made trips to the different jamaats.

The Amir and Missionary In-charge is Maulana Alhaj Noor Mohammed Bin Salih. It is unclear how many Ahmadiyya missionaries are working underneath him.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1921

Nayyar sailed from London to Freetown, in Sierra Leone. While in Freetown Nayyar delivered a lecture at a mosque in Fourah Bay, in the east end of the city at the request of the city’s chief Imam.[6] Although at least six people are said to have conveyed their adherence to the Ahmadiyya movement in Sierra Leone as early as 1916 after being influenced by the circulation of Ahmadiyya literature from neighbouring West African nations, no conversions were recorded following Nayyar’s visit.[6]

After the brief Hiatus in Freetown, Nayyar continued towards Saltpond in the Gold Coast where he arrived in March 1921.[3][4] Following a lecture, the Fante community “believed there and then”, following which an oath of allegiance was held.[2] In the history of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, Mahdi Appah, the leader of this group, is regarded as the first Ghanaian to become an Ahmadi Muslim.[7] Despite resistance from northern clerics, the Fante Muslims converted en masse, giving immediate rise to the Ahmadiyya movement in the region.[3][4] Nayyar also toured Accra and Kumase.[5] Having established the movement in the Gold Coast, Nayyar left within a month for Lagos, in Nigeria, before returning again in fall of 1921.
______________________________________________________________________________________________
1923

Abdur Rahim Nayyar was the first Ahmadi mullah sent to British West Africa. Soon after he was sent, the Khalifa at Qadian ordered Al Hajj Fadl-ul-Rahman Hakim to also go to British West Africa and help, thus, Hakim first went to Nigeria (1922). By 1923, Al Hajj Fadl-ul-Rahman Hakim was mostly working out of Ghana as the first permanent missionary to Ghana. He stayed until 1929, at which point he was called back to Qadian. He returned to Ghana in 1933. He seems to have been relieved by another Ahmadi Mullah, Maulana Nazir Ahmad Ali, technically, he spent only the year of 1936 in Ghana and moved over to Sierra Leone, wherein he was the first ever permanent Ahmadi mullah on the scene. Fadl-ul-Rahman worked as the missionary in-charge of Ghana from 1935 to 1947 (See Fisher). Fadl-ul-Rahman died in Pakistan in 1955.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________1927

By 1927, the Community numbered 3,000 across forty localities in the southern regions and the Ashanti Empire. In 1927, an increased missionary outlook was adopted, which facilitated its spread among the Fante people in the south, the Wala people in the north, and the Ashanti people in-between.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1929

In 1929, Hakim left the colony, only to return again in 1933, for another two years. According to Samwini, the rapid expansion posed a threat to the very existence of Christianity and the Sunni order in the country. Al Hajj Fadl-ul-Rahman Hakim was on this way back to Qadian, he stopped in Nigeria.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________1931

With small number of Muslims being admitted to public schools, the Community petitioned the government, in 1931, to select Muslim members for the government’s board of education.

____________________________________________________________________________________________
1932

The first ever Jalsa Salana is held.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1936

The Ahmadiyya community sends its first Mullah to the British colony of Ghana. His name was Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________1946

By 1946, there were up to three Indian missionaries and five West African missionaries, and four teachers in the country.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1949

The first ever Ahmadiyya mosque is built in Saltpond (see video comments at the 22:42 mark).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________1950

Muhammad Zafrullah Khan claims that the entire Gold Coast converted to Ahmadiyya.

A letter was written in 1946 to the Chief Commission of Ashanti, arguing that most rights and privileges are being afforded to Christians. It was not until 1950 that the colonial government first gave permission to establish an Ahmadiyya school in the Ashanti Empire. The T.I. Ahmadiyya Senior High School in Kumasi was founded on January 50, 1950.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1955

Al Hajj Fadl-ul-Rahman Hakim died in Pakistan.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1961

Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997) is the Amir and Missionary in-charge.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1970

The first time ever, the Khalifa, Mirza Nasir Ahmad visited. He visited Accra and Kumasi. He inaugurated the Ahmadiyya Mosque in Mangoase. However, the mosque doesn’t get fully built until 1988.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1971

While opening the fourth Ahmadiyya hospital in the country in 1971, at Agona SwedruCentral Region, Basharat Ahmad Basir, a leading Ahmadiyya missionary stated that, “opening hospitals and educational facilities in the country was part of the programme of the Movement to regain the lost heritage and glory of Islam.”
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1974

On August 10, 1974, Abdul Wahab Adam was appointed as the Amir (Head) and missionary-in-charge of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Mission of Ghana by the then caliph of the Ahmadiyya movement, Mirza Nasir Ahmad. Adam was the first indigenous Ghanaian to hold this office.[26] In the early part of his ministry, Adam shifted the headquarters of the Ghanaian Ahmadiyya Muslim Community from Saltpond to the capital of the country, Accra. The move came in response to Accra’s growing economic and political influence in the country, which strongly contrasts with Saltpond, a small unknown town in coastal Ghana.

Mirza Tahir Ahmad claims that Abdul Wahab Adam was not good at getting converts. For 20 years he reported only 100-300 converts to Ahmadiyya per year.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1976

Mirza Masroor Ahmad gets sent to Ghana to manage Ahmadiyya finances. He is stationed at Salaga. He was then made as the principal of the Ahmadiyya Secondary School in Essarkyir, located in the centreal region of Ghana. There he served as principal for four years.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1980

Mirza Nasir Ahmad visits Ghana and inaugurates 2 mosques, the Ahmadiyya mosque in Accra (see Ahmadiyya Mosques Around the World) and the Ahmadiyya mosque in Essiam (see Ahmadiyya Mosques Around the World). _____________________________________________________________________________________________
1983

Mirza Masroor Ahmad leaves Ghana for good and never returns.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1988

—Mirza Tahir Ahmad inaugurated the Ahmadiyya mosque in Mangoase, which had been under construction for 17 years.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1990

Mirza Tahir Ahmad tells us that barely 300 people per year were joining Ahmadiyya from Ghana.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1992

Mirza Tahir Ahmad tells us that Ahmadi’s were heavily involved in the election. Ahmadi’s were heavily involved in politics in this era also. Ahmadi’s literally monitored the election.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1996

Mirza Tahir Ahmad lies and claims 200,000 people converted to Ahmadiyya.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
1997

Mirza Tahir Ahmad lies and claims to have had more than 200,000 converts from Ghana. Mirza Tahir Ahmad claims that many Ghanian’s working in government were Ahmadi. He mentions:

1. The speaker of the assembly
2. opposition party leader
3. Deputy Speaker
4. Defense minister
5. Chairman of the ruling party
6. important commission
7.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
2001

Mirza Tahir Ahmad announced 130,000 converts from Ghana to Ahmadiyya (See at the 1:20:00 mark).
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
2004

Mirza Masroor Ahmad visits Ghana for the first time in 20 years.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
2020

Barely 1000 converts are announced by Ahmadiyya sources. Even this a lie.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
2021

MTA Ghana should be the best studio and channel in Africa: Hazrat Khalifatul Masih gives detailed guidance to MTA Ghana Studios

My personal experiences of “Ahmadiyya” and its (lack of) presence in my country, Ghana

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Links and Related Essay’s

Who is the Ahmadi Mullah, Nazir Ahmad Mubasher (1910-1997)?

http://ahmadiyyamosque.blogspot.com/search/label/Ghana

“The Head of The Ahmadiyya Movement” by Muhammad Zafrullah Khan (1950)

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/l-b-agusto-was-a-pioneer-member-of-the-ahmadiyya-movement-in-nigeria-but-he-renounced-membership-when-he-realized-that-members-in-southfield-london-believed-founder-ghulam-ahmad-was-a-prophet/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-fadl-ul-rahman-hakim-the-first-permanent-ahmadi-mullah-sent-to-british-west-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/abdur-rahim-nayyars-first-speech-in-british-west-africa-was-at-the-famous-shitta-bey-mosque/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-fadl-ul-rahman-hakim-the-first-permanent-ahmadi-mullah-sent-to-british-west-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/the-3rd-sect-of-ahmadis-were-created-in-lagos-nigeria-in-1922/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_Ghana

Servants of Allah: Maulana Nazir Ahmad Ali Sahib

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/in-1922-the-ahmadiyya-movement-stole-the-adepopo-mosque-from-the-quranic-people-in-lagos-nigeria/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-jibril-martin-1888-1959-the-ahmadi-in-nigeria-who-rejected-the-qadiani-khilafat-and-created-the-3rd-sect-of-ahmadis/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/21/who-is-the-ahmadi-mullah-abdur-rahim-nayyar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/10/22/who-is-jibril-martin-1888-1959-the-ahmadi-in-nigeria-who-rejected-the-qadiani-khilafat-and-created-the-3rd-sect-of-ahmadis/

Stefan Reichmuth. “Education and the Growth of Religious Associations among Yoruba Muslims: The Ansar-Ud-Deen Society of Nigeria”, Journal of Religion in Africa, Vol. 26, Fasc. 4 (Nov., 1996). p 8.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jibril_Martin

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/professor-humphrey-j-fisher-and-j-spencer-trimingham-called-ahmadiyya-a-maritime-implantation-in-west-africa/

https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/educational-magazines/fisher-humphrey-john-1933

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/09/03/early-history-of-ahmadiyya-in-ghana-by-haneef-keelson/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmadiyya_in_the_Gambia#cite_note-Fisher126-1

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/06/14/who-is-ghulam-nabi-gilkar/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2019/12/14/did-general-muhammad-zia-ul-haq-join-ahmadiyya-in-the-1940s/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/20/islam-vs-ahmadiyya-in-nigeria-1975-by-dr-ismail-a-b-balogan-b-a-ph-d-london-university-of-ibadan/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/09/24/ahmadiyya-a-study-in-contemporary-islam-on-the-west-african-coast-by-humphrey-j-fisher-1963/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/?s=Balogan

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/05/22/ahmadiyya-in-gambia/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/02/19/dr-balogan-the-famous-african-ahmadi-who-left-ahmadiyya-in-1974/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-farimang-mamadi-singhateh-the-governor-general-of-the-gambia-and-an-ahmadi/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2017/09/01/who-is-humphrey-j-fisher-the-writer-who-wrote-extensively-about-ahmadiyya-in-africa/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2018/10/16/trimingham-j-spencer-the-influence-of-islam-upon-africa-1968/

https://ahmadiyyafactcheckblog.com/2020/01/13/ahmadi-medical-officers-doctors-who-served-in-the-british-military-during-ww-2/

  1. “THE AHMADIYYA MOVEMENT IN NIGERIA”. HARVARD DIVINITY SCHOOL. RETRIEVED SEPTEMBER 19, 2015.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d e Animashaun, Bashir (2012) Jibril Felix Martin (1888 – 1959) and the spread of Western education among Muslims in 20th century Lagos. Ilorin Journal of History and International Studies Vol 3 No 1 2012________________________________________________________________________________________
    Tags#ahmadiyyainafrica #ahmadiyyainwestafrica #ahmadiyyainnigeria #ahmadiyyainlagos #lagos #ahmadiyyainghana #ahmadiyyainsierraleone #Ahmadiyyainbritishwestafrica #ahmadiyyainbritishcolonies #ahmadiyyaviacolonialism #ahmadiyyafactcheckblog #ahmadiyya #ahmadiyyat